Franklin

The gas station in America / John A. Jakle & Keith A. Sculle.

Author/Creator:
Jakle, John A.
Publication:
Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, c1994.
Series:
Creating the North American landscape
Creating the North American landscape
Format/Description:
Book
xi, 272 p. : ill., maps ; 26 cm.
Subjects:
Service stations -- United States -- History.
Architecture -- Commercial buildings -- United States -- History.
Architecture -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Roadside architecture -- United States.
Summary:
"The first architect-designed gas station - a Pittsburgh Gulf station in 1913 - was also the first to offer free road maps; the familiar Shell name and logo date from 1907, when a British mother-of-pearl importer expanded its line to include the newly discovered oil of the Dutch East Indies; the first enclosed gas stations were built only after the first enclosed cars made motoring a year-round activity - and operating a service station was no longer a "seasonal" job; the system of "octane" rating was introduced by Sun Oil as a marketing gimmick (74 for premium in 1931)." "As the number of "true" gas stations continues its steady decline - from 239,000 in 1969 to fewer than 100,000 today - the words and images of this book bear witness to an economic and cultural phenomenon that was perhaps more uniquely American than any other of this century."--BOOK JACKET.
Contents:
Gas stations in generational perspective
Place-product-packaging
Marketing strategies in the petroleum industry
Corporate territoriality
The gas station as form
Gas station design - The large corporation
Gas station design - The small entrepreneur
Gas stations as a feature of urban landscape
Conclusion.
Notes:
Includes bibliographical references (p. 249-261) and index.
"Published in cooperation with the Center for American Places."
Contributor:
Sculle, Keith A.
Center for American Places.
ISBN:
0801847230 (alk. paper)
OCLC:
28927327
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