Franklin

Social policy responses to the needs of low-income working mothers in Thailand : the changing welfare mix, 1940-1994 / Pattamaporn Busapathumrong.

Author/Creator:
Busapathumrong, Pattamaporn.
Publication:
1994.
Format/Description:
Microformat
xviii, 185 leaves : ill. ; 29 cm.
Local subjects:
Penn dissertations -- Social work.
Social work -- Penn dissertations.
Summary:
Since the mid-1950s, Thailand has been pushing for industrialization that has, in turn, brought about an influx of workers from rural to urban areas. The push has also led to the participation of women workers, including those who are married and have dependent children, in the labor force. This has caused a large number of low-income working mothers with dependent children in Thailand to confront burdens which stem from carrying dual role of doing housework (such as child care) and of doing paid work. Unfortunately, assistance (such as daycare centers, part-time jobs and parental leave) is limited or unavailable for working mothers.
Purposes. This study examines the extent to which the government, the employers' and the employees' organizations, women non-government organizations (NGOs) and the household respond to the needs of working mothers during 1940-1994. This study also aims at seeking possible ways or solutions to alleviate burdens confronted by working mothers in Thailand.
Methods. To attain possible solutions, this study employs exploratory research to examine past and contemporary responses to the needs of low-income working mothers. The study has been carried out in four phases taking place during 1990-1994. These four phases are Phase I (reviews of literature), Phase II (consultation), Phase III (pilot study), and Phase IV (data collection). The data collection took place in Bangkok, Thailand, during May 1993-February 1994, through documentary research and field research (interviewing and distribution of questionnaires).
Findings and conclusions. There are no direct responses from the government, the employer, and women NGOs to working mothers' special needs. The absence of the responses can possibly be explained by a variety of reasons. Among them are (1) continual emphasis on economic development at the expense of social development; (2) the availability of informal supports (from relatives and friends) in response to the needs of working mothers; and (3) the passive role of women in politics and the management of labor unions.
Recommendations. This study recommends that, in seeking solutions, all of the efforts to be made be directed to three areas. These areas are the policy, the research and the social work practice.
Notes:
Thesis (D.S.W. in Social Work) -- University of Pennsylvania, 1994.
Includes bibliographical references.
Local notes:
University Microfilms order no.: 95-19659.
Contributor:
Estes, Richard J., advisor.
University of Pennsylvania.
OCLC:
187455239
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