Franklin

MLA

True lover of his country. A True State of the Present Difference Between the Royal African Company, and the Separate Traders: Shewing the Irregularities and Impositions of the Joint-stock Managers; the Uselesness of Their Forts; the Expence They Are At In the Maintenance of the Same; the Charge of Supporting Them In a Condition of Defence; the Vast Sums They Have Receiv'd by the Ten Per Cent. Duty In Order Thereunto, and What Had Been Misapply'd to Their Own Private Uses; the Advantages and Reasonableness of an Open Trade to Aftica; And, Lastly, the Danger of an Exclusive Trade, Not Only to the Traders of South and North Britain, But, to Our American Plantations. Written by a True Lover of His Country, and Humbly Submitted to the Wise Consideration of Both Houses of Parliament. London: [s.n.], ndn1.

APA

True lover of his country, T. lover of his country. (ndn1). A true state of the present difference between the Royal African Company, and the separate traders: Shewing the irregularities and impositions of the joint-stock managers; the uselesness of their forts; the expence they are at in the maintenance of the same; the charge of supporting them in a condition of defence; the vast sums they have receiv'd by the ten per cent. Duty in order thereunto, and what had been misapply'd to their own private uses; the advantages and reasonableness of an open trade to Aftica; and, lastly, the danger of an exclusive trade, not only to the traders of South and North Britain, but, to our American plantations. Written by a true lover of his country, and humbly submitted to the wise consideration of both Houses of Parliament. London: [s.n.].

Chicago

True lover of his country. A True State of the Present Difference Between the Royal African Company, and the Separate Traders: Shewing the Irregularities and Impositions of the Joint-Stock Managers; the Uselesness of Their Forts; the Expence They Are At In the Maintenance of the Same; the Charge of Supporting Them In a Condition of Defence; the Vast Sums They Have Receiv'd by the Ten Per Cent. Duty In Order Thereunto, and What Had Been Misapply'd to Their Own Private Uses; the Advantages and Reasonableness of an Open Trade to Aftica; And, Lastly, the Danger of an Exclusive Trade, Not Only to the Traders of South and North Britain, But, to Our American Plantations. Written by a True Lover of His Country, and Humbly Submitted to the Wise Consideration of Both Houses of Parliament. London: [s.n.], ndn1.