Franklin

PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT IN CHAPTER 1 AND NON-CHAPTER 1 SCHOOLS OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PHILADELPHIA AS PERCEIVED BY PRINCIPALS AND PARENTS [electronic resource].

Author/Creator:
MEADE, JOSEPH.
Format/Description:
Book
152 p.
Subjects:
Education.
System Details:
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Summary:
The purpose of this study is to investigate, analyze and understand the perceptions of parental involvement by both principals and parents in Chapter 1 and non-Chapter 1 schools in Philadelphia. A review of the literature reveals that parental involvement is not consistent or equal in all school situations. The literature provides little help to practitioners interested in actually engaging parents in schools. This study carefully documents one case of parent involvement.
This study was conducted over a four-month period from September 1984 through December 1984. Various techniques were used to collect data. Two in depth case studies were conducted in two schools (Chapter 1 and non-Chapter 1). The case studies included observations of parent involvement in the schools, informal and formal principal interviews, school community coordinators interviews, parental interviews and interviews with clergy. In addition, in four schools (two Chapter 1 and two non-Chapter 1) principal interviews, parents interviews and school community coordinator interviews were conducted. The Study (A) Describes and compares the involvement of parents in Chapter 1 and non-Chapter 1 schools. (B) Focuses on what principals do with parents. (C) Examines how principals involved parents since 1980. (D) Describes, where, when and what parents do when they meet.
A review of the recorded events and incidents substantiates the following conclusions. (1) Parent involvement benefits the principal and the school to a greater degree than it benefits parents. (2) Parental involvement as reflected in Chapter 1 schools appears to make little or no difference with respect to the role of parents when compared to non-Chapter 1 parental involvement. (3) Parents spend an inordinate amount of time raising funds. (4) Parents tend to save the School District money by assuming positions which are necessary and would ordinarily require salary and would increase the budgets of individual local schools by massive fund raising efforts.
Notes:
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 47-03, Section: A, page: 0718.
Thesis (Educat.D.)--University of Pennsylvania, 1985.
Local notes:
School code: 0175.
Contributor:
University of Pennsylvania.
Contained In:
Dissertation Abstracts International 47-03A.
Access Restriction:
Restricted for use by site license.
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