Franklin

Using Performance Incentives to Improve Health Outcomes [electronic resource] Paul Gertler

Author/Creator:
Gertler, Paul
Publication:
Washington, D.C., The World Bank, 2012
Format/Description:
Government document
Book
1 online resource
Series:
Policy research working papers.
World Bank e-Library.
Status/Location:
Loading...

Options
Location Notes Your Loan Policy

Details

Other Title:
World Bank working papers.
System Details:
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Summary:
This study examines the effect of performance incentives for health care providers to provide more and higher quality care in Rwanda on child health outcomes. The authors find that the incentives had a large and significant effect on the weight-for-age of children 0-11 months and on the height-for-age of children 24-49 months. They attribute this improvement to increases in the use and quality of prenatal and postnatal care. Consistent with theory, They find larger effects of incentives on services where monetary rewards and the marginal return to effort are higher. The also find that incentives reduced the gap between provider knowledge and practice of appropriate clinical procedures by 20 percent, implying a large gain in efficiency. Finally, they find evidence of a strong complementarity between performance incentives and provider skill.
Notes:
Description based on print version record.
Contributor:
Gertler, Paul
Vermeersch, Christel
World Bank.
Other format:
Print version: Gertler, Paul. Using Performance Incentives to Improve Health Outcomes.
Publisher Number:
10.1596/1813-9450-6100
Access Restriction:
Restricted for use by site license.