Franklin

Moreon the Effectiveness of Public Spendingon Health Care and Education [electronic resource] : A Covariance Structure Model.

Author/Creator:
International Monetary Fund
Publication:
Washington, D.C. : International Monetary Fund, 2002.
Series:
IMF eLibrary
IMF Working Papers; Working Paper No. 02/90.
IMF Working Papers; Working Paper No. 02/90
Format/Description:
Government document
Book
1 online resource (32 p.)
Local subjects:
Access to health services.
Adult illiteracy.
Analysis of Education.
Basic Needs.
Birth.
Child mortality.
Children per woman.
Dropout rates.
Education expenditures.
Education sector.
Education spending.
Educational attainment.
Enrollment rate.
Enrollment rates.
Enrolment rate.
Fertility.
Fertility rate.
Fertility rates.
General Welfare.
Government Policy.
Health care.
Health policy.
Health Production. -- Nutrition, Mortality, Morbidity, Disability, and Economic Behavior
Health services.
Health status.
Higher enrollment.
Infant mortality.
Infant mortality rate.
Mortality rate.
Mortality rates.
Number of children.
Pregnancy.
Primary education.
Primary education enrollment.
Primary enrollment.
Primary enrollment rate.
Primary school.
Primary school dropout.
Primary school enrollment.
Primary schools.
Public expenditure.
Public Health.
Pupil-teacher ratio.
Quality of Life.
Regulation.
School attendance.
School enrollment.
Total fertility rate.
Traditional approach.
Universal primary education.
Algeria.
Bhutan.
Botswana.
Bulgaria.
Cameroon.
Central African Republic.
Dominican Republic.
El Salvador.
Eritrea.
Georgia.
Guinea.
Iran, Islamic Republic of.
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya.
Mauritania.
Romania.
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.
Seychelles.
Slovak Republic.
Sri Lanka.
Uzbekistan.
Summary:
Using data for a sample of developing and transition countries, this paper estimates the relationship between government spending on health care and education, and social indicators. Unlike previous studies, where social indicators are used as proxies for the unobservable health and education status of the population, this paper estimates a latent variable model. The findings suggest that public social spending is an important determinant of social indicators, particularly in the education sector. Overall, the latent variable approach was found to yield more adequate estimates of social production functions, with larger elasticities of social indicators with respect to income and spending on education than the traditional approach, providing stronger evidence that increases in public spending have a positive impact on social indicators. The study also finds that the millennium goal of universal primary education enrollment by 2015 could be achieved through an increase by one-third, on average, in education spending.
Notes:
Description based on print version record.
Contributor:
International Monetary Fund
Other format:
Print Version:
ISBN:
1451851405:
9781451851403
ISSN:
1018-5941
Publisher Number:
10.5089/9781451851403.001
Access Restriction:
Restricted for use by site license.
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