Franklin

CBS News Monthly Poll #1, May 2010 [electronic resource]/ CBS News .

Publication:
Ann Arbor, Mich. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2011.
Format/Description:
Datafile
1 online resource.
Edition:
2011-08-10
Series:
ICPSR (Series) 31571.
ICPSR 31571
Status/Location:
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Summary:
This poll, fielded May 4-5, 2010, is a part of a continuing series of monthly surveys that solicits public opinion on the presidency and on a range of other political and social issues. Respondents were asked whether they felt things in the country were going in the right direction and whether they approved of the way Hillary Clinton was handling her job as secretary of state. Respondents were also asked whether they thought being a mother at the time of the poll was harder compared to when they were children, and how often they expected to barbeque that summer. Several questions were asked regarding birth control pills including whether respondents felt birth control pills had been one of the country's most significant medical developments, how much impact the development of the birth control pill has had on American society overall, in women's lives, and on American attitudes toward sex, and whether the development of the birth control pill had been a change for the better for American family life. Opinions were also sought on whether birth control pills made it easier for women to have jobs and careers outside the home, whether respondents believed most men would be willing to use birth control pills, whether birth control pills could be used safely, whether birth control was effective, and whether they thought birth control pills' safety was better than other methods of birth control for women's health. Demographic information includes sex, age, race, education level, household income, military service, religious preference, reported social class, type of residential area (e.g., urban or rural), political party affiliation, political philosophy, voter registration status, and whether respondents thought of themselves as born again Christians. Cf.: http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR31571.v1
Notes:
Title from ICPSR DDI metadata of 2015-01-05.
Contributor:
CBS News
Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research.
Access Restriction:
Restricted for use by site license.