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The Victorian eye [electronic resource] : a political history of light and vision in Britain, 1800-1910 / Chris Otter.

Author/Creator:
Otter, Chris.
Publication:
Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2008.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (393 p.)
Status/Location:
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Subjects:
Lighting -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century.
Lighting -- Great Britain -- History -- 20th century.
Lighting -- Social aspects -- Great Britain -- History.
Lighting -- Political aspects -- Great Britain -- History.
Optical engineering -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century.
Visual perception.
Great Britain -- Social life and customs -- 19th century.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Language:
English
Summary:
During the nineteenth century, Britain became the first gaslit society, with electric lighting arriving in 1878. At the same time, the British government significantly expanded its power to observe and monitor its subjects. How did such enormous changes in the way people saw and were seen affect Victorian culture? To answer that question, Chris Otter mounts an ambitious history of illumination and vision in Britain, drawing on extensive research into everything from the science of perception and lighting technologies to urban design and government administ
Contents:
Frontmatter
Contents
Illustrations
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Light, Vision, and Power
1. The Victorian Eye: The Physiology, Sociology, and Spatiality of Vision, 1800-1900
2. Oligoptic Engineering: Light and the Victorian City
3. The Age of Inspectability: Vision, Space, and the Victorian City
4. The Government of Light: Gasworks, Gaslight, and Photometry
5. Technologies of Illumination, 1870-1910
6. Securing Perception: Assembling Electricity Networks
Conclusion: Patterns of Perception
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Notes:
Description based upon print version of record.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [339]-363) and index.
ISBN:
1-281-96612-6
9786611966126
0-226-64078-7
OCLC:
567944008
Publisher Number:
10.7208/9780226640785 doi