Franklin

Philosophy and the study of religions : a manifesto / Kevin Schilbrack.

Author/Creator:
Schilbrack, Kevin, 1964-
Publication:
Chichester, West Sussex : John Wiley & Sons, 2014.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (358 p.)
Series:
Blackwell manifestos.
Wiley-Blackwell manifestos
Status/Location:
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Subjects:
Religions -- Philosophy.
Religions.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Language:
English
Summary:
The Future of the Philosophy of Religion advocates a radical transformation of the discipline from its current, narrow focus on questions of God, to a fully global form of critical reflection on religions in all their variety and dimensions. Opens the discipline of philosophy of religion to the religious diversity that characterizes the world todayBuilds bridges between philosophy of religion and the other interpretative and explanatory approaches in the field of religious studiesProvides a manifesto for a global approach to the subject that is a practice-centr
Contents:
Cover; Series; Title Page; Copyright; Dedication; Preface; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1: The Full Task of Philosophy of Religion; i. What is "Traditional Philosophy of Religion"?; ii. The First Task of Philosophy of Religion; iii. The Second Task of Philosophy of Religion; iv. The Third Task of Philosophy of Religion; v. What is the Big Idea?; Bibliographic Essay; Endnotes; Chapter 2: Are Religious Practices Philosophical?; i. Toward a Philosophy of Religious Practice; ii. Embodiment as a Paradigm for Philosophy of Religion; iii. Conceptual Metaphors and Embodied Religious Reason
iv. Religious Material Culture as Cognitive Prostheticsv. A Toolkit for the Philosophical Study of Religious Practices; Bibliographic Essay; Endnotes; Chapter 3: Must Religious People Have Religious Beliefs?; i. The Place of Belief in the Study of Religions; ii. Objections to the Concept of Religious Belief; iii. Holding One's Beliefs in Public; iv. What We Presuppose When We Attribute Beliefs; v. The Universality of Belief; Bibliographic Essay; Endnotes; Chapter 4: Do Religions Exist?; i. The Critique of "Religion"; ii. The Ontology of "Religion"
iii. Can There be Religion Without "Religion"?iv. "Religion" as Distortion; v. The Ideology of "Religion"; Bibliographic Essay; Endnotes; Chapter 5: What Isn't Religion?; i. Strategies for Defining Religion; ii. Making Promises: The Functional or Pragmatic Aspect of Religion; iii. Keeping Promises: The Substantive or Ontological Aspect of Religion; iv. The Growing Variety of Religious Realities; v. What this Definition Excludes; Bibliographic Essay; Endnotes; Chapter 6: Are Religions Out of Touch With Reality?; i. Religious Metaphysics in a Postmetaphysical Age; ii. Antimetaphysics Today
iii. Constructive Postmodernism and Unmediated Experienceiv. Unmediated Experience and Metaphysics; v. The Rehabilitation of Religious Metaphysics; Bibliographic Essay; Endnotes; Chapter 7: The Academic Study of Religions: a Map With Bridges; i. Religious Studies as a Tripartite Field; ii. Describing and Explaining Religious Phenomena; iii. Evaluating Religious Phenomena; iv. Do Evaluative Approaches Belong in the Academy?; v. Interdisciplinary Bridges; Bibliographic Essay; Endnotes; Works Cited; Index
Notes:
Description based upon print version of record.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Description based on print version record.
ISBN:
1-4443-3052-7
1-118-39388-0
1-118-32307-6
OCLC:
866442815