Franklin

Molecular Theory of Capillarity [electronic resource].

Author/Creator:
Rowlinson, J. S.
Publication:
Newburyport : Dover Publications, 2013.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (595 p.)
Series:
Dover Books on Chemistry
Dover Books on Chemistry
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Details

Subjects:
Capillarity.
Molecular theory.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Language:
English
Summary:
History of thought on molecular origins of surface phenomena offers a critical and detailed examination and assessment of modern theories, focusing on statistical mechanics and application of results in mean-field approximation to model systems. Emphasis on liquid-gas surface, with a focus on liquid-liquid surfaces in the final chapters. 1989 edition.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Principal Symbols; 1. Mechanical Molecular Models; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Molecular mechanics; 1.3 Capillary phenomena; 1.4 The internal energy of a liquid; 1.5 The continuous surface profile; 1.6 The mean molecular field; 2. Thermodynamics; 2.1 Thermodynamics and kinetic theory; 2.2 The thermodynamics of the surface; 2.3 Surface functions; 2.4 The spherical surface; 2.5 Quasi-thermodynamics-a first look; 3. THE THEORY OF VAN DER WAALS; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 The surface tension; 3.3 Independently variable densities
3.4 Gibbs adsorption equation in the van der Waals theory3.5 Constraints on the range of fluctuations; 4. Statistical Mechanics of the Liquid-Gas Surface; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Distribution and correlation functions; 4.3 The pressure tensor; 4.4 The virial route to the surface tension; 4.5 Functionals of the distribution functions; 4.6 The surface tension from the direct correlation function; 4.7 Equivalence of the two expressions for the surface tension; 4.8 The spherical surface; 4.9 Density fluctuations and their correlation; 4.10 Local thermodynamic functions
5. Model Fluids in the Mean-Field Approximation5.1 Introduction: mean-field theory of a homogeneous fluid of attracting hard spheres; 5.2 Liquid-gas interface in the model of attracting hard spheres; 5.3 Lattice-gas model: one component; 5.4 Lattice-gas model: two components; 5.5 Penetrable-sphere model: theory; 5.6 Penetrable-sphere model: applications; 5.7 Penetrable-sphere model: spherical surfaces; 6. Computer Simulation of the Liquid-Gas Surface; 6.1 The experimental background; 6.2 The methods of computer simulation; 6.3 The density profile; 6.4 The surface tension; 6.5 Further work
7. Calculation of the Density Profile7.1 Introduction; 7.2 Solution of the YBG equation; 7.3 Approximations for the direct correlation function; 7.4 Modified van der Waals theories; 7.5 Perturbation theories; 7.6 Surface tension; 8. Three-Phase Equilibrium; 8.1 Introduction; 8.2 Contact angles and Neumann's triangle; 8.3 Spreading and Antonow's rule; 8.4 The αα Interface; 8.5 Phase transitions in interfaces. The Cahn transition; 8.6 Three-phase line and line tension; 9. Interfaces Near Critical Points; 9.1 Introduction: mean-field approximation
9.2 Digression on the Ornstein-Zernike theory of the pair-correlation function9.3 Digression on critical-point exponents; 9.4 Van der Waals theory with non-classical exponents; 9.5 Tricritical points; 9.6 Non-critical interface near a critical endpoint; 9.7 Renormalization-group theory; field-theoretical models; Appendix 1 Thermodynamics; Appendix 2 Dirac's delta-function; Name Index; Subject Index
Notes:
Description based upon print version of record.
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Contributor:
Widom, B.
ISBN:
0-486-31709-9
1-62198-686-1
OCLC:
868280640