Franklin

The Oxford handbook on the science of science communication / edited by Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Dan Kahan, Dietram Scheufele.

Publication:
New York, NY, United States of America : Oxford University Press, [2017]
Format/Description:
Book
xxii, 486 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm.
Series:
Oxford library of psychology.
Oxford library of psychology
Status/Location:
Loading...

Get It

Details

Subjects:
Communication in science.
Science.
Summary:
"The proposal to vaccinate adolescent girls against the human papilloma virus ignited political controversy, as did the advent of fracking and a host of other emerging technologies. These disputes attest to the persistent gap between expert and public perceptions. Complicating the communication of sound science and the debates that surround the societal applications of that science is a changing media environment in which misinformation can elicit belief without corrective context and likeminded individuals are prone to seek ideologically comforting information within their own self-constructed media enclaves. Drawing on the expertise of leading science communication scholars from six countries, The Oxford Handbook of the Science of Science Communication not only charts the media landscape - from news and entertainment to blogs and films - but also examines the powers and perils of human biases - from the disposition to seek confirming evidence to the inclination to overweight endpoints in a trend line. In the process, it draws together the best available social science on ways to communicate science while also minimizing the pernicious effects of human bias. The Handbook adds case studies exploring instances in which communication undercut or facilitated the access to scientific evidence. The range of topics addressed is wide, from genetically engineered organisms and nanotechnology to vaccination controversies and climate change. Also unique to this book is a focus on the complexities of involving the public in decision making about the uses of science, the regulations that should govern its application, and the ethical boundaries within which science should operate. The Handbook is an invaluable resource for researchers in the communication fields, particularly in science and health communication, as well as to scholars involved in research on scientific topics susceptible to distortion in partisan debate" -- Provided by publisher's website.
Contents:
Introduction: Why Science Communication? / Dan M. Kahan, Dietram A. Scheufele, Kathleen Hall Jamieson
Publication Bias in Science: What is it, Why is it Problematic, and How Can It Be Addressed? / Andrew Brown, Tapan Mehta, David Allison
Statistical Biases in Science Communication: What We Know About Them and How They Can Be Addressed / John Ioannidis
Is there a Hype Problem in Science? If so, How is it Addressed? / Peter Weingart
Is there a Retraction Problem? And, If So, What Do We Know About How It Is and Can Be Addressed? Is there a Retraction Problem? And, If So, What Do We Know About How It Is and Can Be Addressed? / Adam Marcus, Ivan Oransky
A Recap: Identifying and Overcoming Challenges to Science Featured in Attacks on Science / Joseph Hilgard
A Comparative Study of Communication about Food Safety Before, During, and After the “Mad Cow” Crisis / Matteo Ferrari^^^seek confirming evidence to the inclination to overweight endpoints in a trend line. In the process, it draws together the best available social science on ways to communicate science while also minimizing the pernicious effects of human bias. The Handbook adds case studies exploring instances in which communication undercut or facilitated the access to scientific evidence. The range of topics addressed is wide, from genetically engineered organisms and nanotechnology to vaccination controversies and climate change. Also unique to this book is a focus on the complexities of involving the public in decision making about the uses of science, the regulations that should govern its application, and the ethical boundaries within which science should operate. The Handbook is an invaluable resource for researchers in the communication fields, particularly in science and health communication, as well as to scholars involved in research on scientific topics susceptible to distortion in partisan debate"
Provided by publisher's website.
^ Cross-National Comparative Communication and Deliberation about the Risks of Nanotechnologies / Nick Pidgeon, Barbara Herr Harthorn, Terre Satterfield, Christina Demski
Communications about Biotechnologies and GMOs across Europe / Heinz Bonfadelli
A Tale of Two Vaccines-and their Science Communication Environments / Dan M. Kahan, Ashley Landrum
A Recap: Science Communication in Action / Heather Akin
The Need for a Science of Science Communication: Communicating Science's Values and Norms / Kathleen Hall Jamieson
Science Communication at Scientific Institutions / Tiffany Lohwater, Martin Storksdieck
The Role of Scholarly Presses and Journals / Barbara Kline Pope, Elizabeth Marincola
The Role of Governmental Organizations in Communicating About Regulating Science / Jeffrey Morris
Science Communication and Museums' Changing Roles / Victoria Cain, Karen Rader
The Role of Funding Organizations: Foundations^^erweight endpoints in a trend line. In the process, it draws together the best available social science on ways to communicate science while also minimizing the pernicious effects of human bias. The Handbook adds case studies exploring instances in which communication undercut or facilitated the access to scientific evidence. The range of topics addressed is wide, from genetically engineered organisms and nanotechnology to vaccination controversies and climate change. Also unique to this book is a focus on the complexities of involving the public in decision making about the uses of science, the regulations that should govern its application, and the ethical boundaries within which science should operate. The Handbook is an invaluable resource for researchers in the communication fields, particularly in science and health communication, as well as to scholars involved in research on scientific topics susceptible to distortion in partisan debate"
Provided by publisher's website.
^ Elizabeth Good Christopherson
Promoting Popular Understanding of Science and Health through Social Networks / Brian G. Southwell
Designing Public Deliberation at the Intersection of Science and Public Policy / John Gastil
Translating Science Into Policy and Legislation: Evidence-based policy making / Jason Gallo
A Recap: The Role of Intermediaries in Communicating Science: A Synthesis / Ashley Landrum
The (Changing) Nature of Scientist-Media Interactions: A Cross National Analysis / Sara Yeo, Dominique Brossard
Overview of the Science of Science Communication / Heather Akin
New Models of Knowledge-Based Journalism / Matthew Nisbet, Declan Fahy
Citizens Making Sense of Science Issues: Supply and Demand Factors for Science News and Information in the Digital Age / Michael Xenos
The Changing Popular Images of Science / David Kirby^^^ia Cain, Karen Rader
The Role of Funding Organizations: Foundations^^erweight endpoints in a trend line. In the process, it draws together the best available social science on ways to communicate science while also minimizing the pernicious effects of human bias. The Handbook adds case studies exploring instances in which communication undercut or facilitated the access to scientific evidence. The range of topics addressed is wide, from genetically engineered organisms and nanotechnology to vaccination controversies and climate change. Also unique to this book is a focus on the complexities of involving the public in decision making about the uses of science, the regulations that should govern its application, and the ethical boundaries within which science should operate. The Handbook is an invaluable resource for researchers in the communication fields, particularly in science and health communication, as well as to scholars involved in research on scientific topics susceptible to distortion in partisan debate"
Provided by publisher's website.
^ What Do We Know About the Entertainment Industry's Portrayal of Science? How Does it Affect Public Attitudes Toward Science? / James Shanahan
How Narrative Functions in Entertainment to Communicate Science / Martin Kaplan, Michael Dahlstrom
Assumptions about Science in Satirical News and Late Night Comedy / Lauren Feldman
A Recap: The Role, Power, and Peril of Media for the Communication of Science / Nan Li, Robert Lull
Countering False Beliefs: An Analysis of the Evidence and Recommendations of Best Practices for the Retraction and Correction of Scientific Misinformation / Man-pui Sally Chan, Christopher Jones, Dolores Albarracin
Using Frames to Make Scientific Communication More Effective / James N. Druckman, Arthur Lupia
Philosophical Impediments to Citizens' Use of Science / Jonathan Baron
On the Sources of Ordinary Science Knowledge and Extraordinary Science Ignorance / Dan M. Kahan^^^anizations: Foundations^^erweight endpoints in a trend line. In the process, it draws together the best available social science on ways to communicate science while also minimizing the pernicious effects of human bias. The Handbook adds case studies exploring instances in which communication undercut or facilitated the access to scientific evidence. The range of topics addressed is wide, from genetically engineered organisms and nanotechnology to vaccination controversies and climate change. Also unique to this book is a focus on the complexities of involving the public in decision making about the uses of science, the regulations that should govern its application, and the ethical boundaries within which science should operate. The Handbook is an invaluable resource for researchers in the communication fields, particularly in science and health communication, as well as to scholars involved in research on scientific topics susceptible to distortion in partisan debate"
Provided by publisher's website.
^ Overcoming Confirmation and Blind Spot Bias When Communicating Science / Kate Kenski
Understanding and Overcoming Selective Exposure and Judgement When Communicating About Science / Natalie Jomini Stroud
Overcoming Innumeracy and the Use of Heuristics When Communicating Science / Ellen Peters
Overcoming Biases in Processing of Time Series Data about Climate / Bruce Hardy, Kathleen Hall Jamieson
Understanding and Overcoming Fear Of the Unnatural in Discussion of GMOs / Robert Lull, Dietram A. Scheufele
Protecting or Polluting the Science Communication Environment? The Case of Childhood Vaccines / Dan M. Kahan
Overcoming false causal attribution: debunking the MMR-autism association / Nan Li, Talia Stroud, Kathleen Hall Jamieson
Overcoming the challenges of communicating uncertainty across national contexts / Michael Siegrist, Christina Hartmann
A Recap: Heuristics, Biases, Values and Other Challenges to Communicating Science^^ts in a trend line. In the process, it draws together the best available social science on ways to communicate science while also minimizing the pernicious effects of human bias. The Handbook adds case studies exploring instances in which communication undercut or facilitated the access to scientific evidence. The range of topics addressed is wide, from genetically engineered organisms and nanotechnology to vaccination controversies and climate change. Also unique to this book is a focus on the complexities of involving the public in decision making about the uses of science, the regulations that should govern its application, and the ethical boundaries within which science should operate. The Handbook is an invaluable resource for researchers in the communication fields, particularly in science and health communication, as well as to scholars involved in research on scientific topics susceptible to distortion in partisan debate"
Provided by publisher's website.
^ Heather Akin, Ashley Landrum
Conclusion: On the Horizon
The Changing Science Communication Environment / Dietram A. Scheufele, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, Dan M. Kahan
How Changing Media Structures are Affecting Science News Coverage / Mike S. Schäfer
What the Public Thinks and Knows about Science: And Why it Matters / William Hallman
Scientific Controversies: Can the Science of Science Communication Provide Management Guidance or only Analysis? / Bruce Lewenstein
A Recap: The Science of Communicating Science / Joseph Hilgard, Nan Li
“Self-Correcting”: How Retractions and Peer-Review Problems are Exploited to Attack Science / Joseph Hilgard, Kathleen Hall Jamieson
Conclusion: On the horizon: the changing science communication environment / Dietram A. Scheufele, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, and Dan Kahan.
Notes:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contributor:
Jamieson, Kathleen Hall, editor.
Kahan, Dan M., editor.
Scheufele, Dietram, editor.
Other format:
Online version: Oxford handbook on the science of science communication
ISBN:
9780190497620 (hardcover : alk. paper)
0190497629 (hardcover : alk. paper)
OCLC:
962750268