Franklin

Regime change and the role of airpower [electronic resource] / David T. Fahrenkrug.

Author/Creator:
Fahrenkrug, David T.
Publication:
Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. : School of Advanced Air and Space Studies, Air University, 2003.
Format/Description:
Government document
Book
1 online resource
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Other Title:
Role of airpower
JSTOR Security Studies.
Subjects:
Coup d'├ętat (Vietnam : 1963).
Vietnam War (1961-1975).
Political stability.
Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Aerial operations.
Air power -- Political aspects.
Air warfare -- History.
Politics and war.
United States -- Politics and government -- 1963-1969.
Vietnam (Republic) -- History -- Coup d'├ętat, 1963.
Form/Genre:
History.
System Details:
System requirements: Adobe Acrobat Reader.
Summary:
Drawing from the vision of airpower theorists, and building on insights gained from studies on various regime changes, this thesis advances a theory of regime change and outlines a strategy for the use of airpower. In order to remain in power, regimes must continue to provide goods to the group of people responsible for its rise to power - the winning coalition. Different types of regimes rely on different types of goods to satisfy their winning coalition. This thesis advances the hypothesis that adversely affecting these goods will create policy failure, increase dissatisfaction among the winning coalition, and cause members to seek out a new coalition and regime to provide the lost goods. Additionally, since many regimes supply goods to third parties in order to retain their support, a third hypothesis was introduced to account for the influence of international support. Analysis of an American and South Vietnamese regime change demonstrated that overthrowing a particular type of regime is directly related to attacks on certain types of goods, thus providing a better model for airpower strategists planning a regime change. The theory outlined in this thesis is founded on theoretical limits for regime types and few regimes actually exist at these extremes still, the more democratic a regime, the more airpower should focus on public goods. Conversely, the more autocratic a regime, the airpower should attack private goods.
Contents:
Introduction
The theory
The causal mechanism
American regime change
South Vietnamese regime change
Conclusion.
Notes:
"June 2003."
"A Thesis presented to the faculty of the School of Advanced Air and Space Studies for completion of graduation requirements."
Includes bibliographical references (pages 78-80).
Contributor:
Air University (U.S.). School of Advanced Airpower Studies.
OCLC:
64028074
Access Restriction:
Restricted for use by site license.