Franklin

Pathobiology of Cancer Regimen-Related Toxicities / edited by Stephen T. Sonis, Dorothy M. Keefe.

Publication:
New York, NY : Springer New York : Imprint: Springer, 2013.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (X, 292 pages)
Edition:
1st ed. 2013.
Series:
Biomedical and Life Sciences (Springer-11642)
Contained In:
Springer eBooks
Status/Location:
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Details

Subjects:
Cancer -- Research.
Pharmacology.
Local subjects:
Cancer Research. (search)
Pharmacology/Toxicology. (search)
System Details:
text file PDF
Summary:
Toxicities have been consistent undesirable companions of every form of radiation and drug cancer treatment regimens.  In addition to the potential for toxicities to devastate patients' quality of life, they generate huge incremental financial costs, and sap patients' ability to tolerate definitive cancer therapy.   And every new drug or biological has come with new side effects.   Historically, regimen-related toxicities were viewed as the inevitable cost of treating cancer.  But this may be about to change. Discoveries in the past dozen years have painted a new picture of the pathobiology of almost all regimen-related toxicities.  The mechanistic complexities that underlie radiation- and chemotherapy-induced tissue injury or systemic symptoms have been pieced together in an incremental sequence which now provides multiple targets for effective toxicity interventions. This book brings together, for the first time in a single volume, the most current information regarding both general principles guiding current thinking about the pathogenesis of regimen-related toxicities and the specific biological underpinnings of the most common side effects of cancer therapy.  The contents provide information that is essential to clinicians and basic and translational scientists interested in cancer therapy and its toxicities.
Contents:
Preface.-Epidemiology and outcomes of regimen-related toxicities
The biological basis for differences in normal tissue response to radiation therapy and strategies to establish predictive assays for individual complication risk
The bystander effect: Ionizing radiation-induced non-targeted effects: Evidence, mechanism and significance
The role of genes on the metabolism of chemotherapeutic agents and their impact on toxicity.-  Animal models of regimen-related toxicities
Nausea and Vomiting
Mucositis
Dermatitis and Alopecia.-  Fibrosis.-  Myelosuppression
Neuropathy
Fatigue
Xerostomia
Osteonecrosis
Conclusions and therapeutic opportunities
Index.
Contributor:
Sonis, Stephen T. editor., Editor,
Keefe, Dorothy M. editor., Editor,
SpringerLink (Online service)
Other format:
Printed edition:
Printed edition:
Printed edition:
ISBN:
978-1-4614-5438-0
9781461454380
Publisher Number:
10.1007/978-1-4614-5438-0 doi
Access Restriction:
Restricted for use by site license.