Franklin

American Negro folklore / by J. Mason Brewer.

Author/Creator:
Brewer, John Mason, 1896-1975 compiler.
Edition:
First paperback edition.
Publication:
New York, N.Y. : Quadrangle Books / The New York Times Book Company, [1968] , ©1968
Format/Description:
Book
xviii, 386 pages : music ; 21 cm
Subjects:
African Americans -- Folklore.
United States -- Social life and customs.
African Americans.
Manners and customs.
United States.
Form/Genre:
Folklore.
Place of Publication:
United States New York (State) New York (City)
Summary:
Anthology of tales, songs, memoirs, superstitions, proverbs, rhymes, riddles, and names.
Contents:
TALES
The wonderful tar-baby
How Mr. Rabbit was too sharp for Mr. Fox
De wolf, de rabbit, and de tar baby
Eyeball candy
Mr. Rabbit and Mr. Bear
Mr. Fox goes a-hunting, but Mr. Rabbit bags the game
Granny's version of the owl
Sheer crops
Buh owl an buh rooster
Buh lion an buh goat
Story of a cow
Buh hawss en' buh bule
Why the Negro is black
Why the Negro is black (Uncle Remus' version)
Why the Holy Amen Church has two doors
Why the rabbit has a short tail
Why the buzzard has a red head
Granny's version of the eagle who became a girl
How the church came to be split up
Why there are so many mosquitoes on the East Coast
John and his boss-man's watermelon patch
John and the two white men in court
Ole Pete
The green runner
The sweetheart of Harriet Tubman's brother
King Charley of Albany
Peg Leg and the Tulsa race riot
Nancy Vaughn
Jim Beckwourth, frontiersman
Memories of lead belly
Little Black Sambo from Guinea
Treasure hunting story
The sprinkle man
A ghost voodoo story
A fish story from Farmville, Virginia
Uncle Henry and the dog ghost
The Saturday night fiddler
The half-clad ghost
The deserted village
Two ghost stories from the same section of Virginia
A Negro ghost story
Little Nero and the magic tea cakes
The red toro of Hidalgo County
Ropes cost money
The "George West" steer
The Palacios rancher and the preacher
Aunt Dicy and the mailman
Aunt Dicy and the snuff salesman
According to where the drop falls
Aunt Dicy and Booker T. Washington's speech
Twelve days after Christmas
The talking mule
Why the Jews don't eat hog
The white quail
The Detroit race riot
Pony Moore's story
The coon in the box
The big watermelon
Brand-name stories
Jack and Dinah
Uncle Si, his boss-man, and Hell
Uncle Aaron loses his home
Uncle Aaron goes fishing
Uncle Aaron orders a baking pan
The woman hurricane
Who's ready for who?
A laugh that meant freedom
The cotton-pickin' monkeys
The Oklahoma freedman
They went riding snow-white horses
A queer conception of beauty
Paid for in privilege
Too many "ups"
Little Julia and her grandmother's cat
The Negro taxi driver's trial
A yellow bastard
Tim and Bill from Summerville
How Uncle Steve interpreted Spanish
Elvannah's leave-taking
Gib Morgan's fight
John Green Peas
THE NEGRO'S RELIGION
Brother Brown's announcement
The boy who played Jesus
Witness of the Johnstown flood in Heaven
Sister Rosie and the African missionary
God throws a tree limb
Brother Gregg identifies himself
Why so many Negroes are in Heaven
Sister Sadie Washington's littlest boy
The preacher and his farmer brother
A job for God
Little David's question
Why we come to church
The danger of neglect
De progicul son
De tetter wine Christun
A Negro's version of Heaven and Hell
"Dem sebun wimmin"
Prayers (The white man's prayer ; The Negro's prayer ; Prayer)
SONGS
PERSONAL EXPERIENCES
"I can't forgive her, the way she used to beat us"
If all slaves had belonged to white folks like ours
Out of the mouths of ex-slaves
Kicked around like a mule
"Master got good when war come up"
Mulatto whom owners treated like a family member
The Negro slave's pride
Harriet Parker on slavery
Dorie Boyd on freedom and Reconstruction
Reconstruction was a mighty hard pull
Ku Klux
Little but "way out in front"
The Reverend Matthew N. McRae on "the closest I evuh come to bein' robbed"
Hooked in the heart
Everything just fits
Jesus handed me a ticket
Negroes in the Civil War
He wanted to ask a question
Experiences of a chimney sweeper
New Orleans' first "baby doll"
A wife longs for the town
A farm wife tells of her children
A Negro cowboy: J. H. Brewer
Trabbler man
No money, but provisions
Jim Finn on calling up the Devil
Luster an' de Devil
A Harlem jive spiel
SUPERSTITIONS
Bad luck signs
Birds of ill omen
Gambling superstitions, among others
Popular beliefs and superstitions
Don'ts
Signs
Weather lore (Cold weather signs ; Warm weather signs ; Fair weather signs ; Stormy weather signs)
Superstitions about animals
Folk beliefs from Florida
Beliefs from Georgia (The lady in black ; A witch story ; Flying people)
PROVERBS
RHYMES
RIDDLES
NAMES
CHILDREN'S RHYMES AND PASTIMES.
Notes:
"Copyright ©1968 by J. Mason Brewer"--verso of title page.
Local notes:
Kislak Center Banks Collection copy presented to the Penn Libraries in 2018 by Joanna Banks.
Penn Provenance:
Banks, Joanna (donor) (Banks Collection copy)
Penn Chronology:
1968
Contributor:
Quadrangle Books, publisher.
New York Times Company, publisher.
Joanna Banks Collection of African American Books (University of Pennsylvania)
Other format:
Online version: Brewer, John Mason, 1896-1975. American Negro folklore.
Online version: Brewer, John Mason, 1896-1975. American Negro folklore.
ISBN:
0812904524
9780812904529
OCLC:
974719334
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