Franklin

Reclaiming Identity : Realist Theory and the Predicament of Postmodernism / Paula M. L. Moya, Michael R. Hames-García.

Publication:
Berkeley, CA : University of California Press, [2000]
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (364 pages)
Contained In:
De Gruyter University Press Library.
Status/Location:
Loading...

Options
Location Notes Your Loan Policy

Details

Subjects:
Group identity.
Postmodernism.
Social perception.
Language:
In English.
System Details:
Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.
text file PDF
Summary:
"Identity" is one of the most hotly debated topics in literary theory and cultural studies. This bold and groundbreaking collection of ten essays argues that identity is not just socially constructed but has real epistemic and political consequences for how people experience the world. Advocating a "postpositivist realist" approach to identity, the essays examine the ways in which theory, politics, and activism clash with or complement each other, providing an alternative to the widely influential postmodernist understandings of identity. Although theoretical in orientation, this dynamic collection deals with specific social groups-Chicanas/os, African Americans, gay men and lesbians, Asian Americans, and others-and concrete social issues directly related to race, ethnicity, sexuality, epistemology, and political resistance. Satya Mohanty's brilliant exegesis of Toni Morrison's Beloved serves as a launching pad for the collection. The essays that follow, written by prominent and up-and-coming scholars, address a range of topics-from the writings of Cherrie Moraga, Franz Fanon, Joy Kogawa, and Michael Nava to the controversy surrounding racial program housing on college campuses-and work toward a truly interdisciplinary approach to identity.
Contents:
Frontmatter
Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Reclaiming Identity
1. The Epistemic Status of Cultural Identity: On Beloved and the Postcolonial Condition
2. Postmodernism, "Realism," and the Politics of Identity: Cherríe Moraga and Chicana Feminism
3· "Who Are Our Own People?": Challenges for a Theory of Social Identity
4. On Representing Others: Intellectuals, Pedagogy, and the Uses of Error
5. "It Matters to Get the Facts Straight": Joy Kogawa, Realism, and Objectivity of Values
6. Racial Authenticity and White Separatism: The Future of Racial Program Housing on College Campuses
7. Who Says Who Says?: The Epistemological Grounds for Agency in Liberatory Political Projects
8. Is There Something You Need to Tell Me?: Coming Out and the Ambiguity of Experience
9. Reading "Experience": The Debate in Intellectual History among Scott, Toews, and LaCapra
10. Who's Afraid of Identity Politics?
Contributors
Index
Notes:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed 24. Apr 2020)
Contributor:
Hames-García, Michael R., editor., Editor,
Moya, Paula M. L., editor., Editor,
De Gruyter.
ISBN:
9780520924949
OCLC:
49851892
Publisher Number:
10.1525/9780520924949 doi
Access Restriction:
Restricted for use by site license.