Franklin

Black Dogs and Blue Words : Depression and Gender in the Age of Self-Care / Kimberly K. Emmons.

Author/Creator:
Emmons, Kimberly K., author., Author,
Publication:
New Brunswick, NJ : Rutgers University Press, [2010]
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (230 p.) : 11 illustrations, 9 tables
Contained In:
De Gruyter University Press Library.
Status/Location:
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Language:
In English.
System Details:
Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.
text file PDF
Summary:
His "black dog"--that was how Winston Churchill referred to his own depression. Today, individuals with feelings of sadness and irritability are encouraged to "talk to your doctor." These have become buzz words in the aggressive promotion of wonder-drug cures since 1997, when the Food and Drug Administration changed its guidelines for the marketing of prescription pharmaceuticals. Black Dogs and Blue Words analyzes the rhetoric surrounding depression. Kimberly K. Emmons maintains that the techniques and language of depression marketing strategies--vague words such as "worry," "irritability," and "loss of interest"--target women and young girls and encourage self-diagnosis and self-medication. Further, depression narratives and other texts encode a series of gendered messages about health and illness. As depression and other forms of mental illness move from the medical-professional sphere into that of the consumer-public, the boundary at which distress becomes disease grows ever more encompassing, the need for remediation and treatment increasingly warranted. Black Dogs and Blue Words demonstrates the need for rhetorical reading strategies as one response to these expanding and gendered illness definitions.
Contents:
Frontmatter
Contents
List of Illustrations and Tables
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Depression and Gender in the Age of Self-Care
1. Depression, a Rhetorical Illness
2. Articulate Depression: The Discursive Legacy of Biological Psychiatry
3. Strategic Imprecision and the Self-Doctoring Drive
4. Isolating Words: Metaphors That Shape Depression's Identities
5. Telling Stories of Depression: Models for the Gendered Self
6. Diagnostic Genres and the Reconfiguring of Medical Expertise
Conclusion: Toward a Rhetorical Care of the Self
Notes
Index
About the Author
Notes:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed 21. Dez 2019)
Contributor:
De Gruyter.
ISBN:
9780813549224
OCLC:
642200649
Publisher Number:
10.36019/9780813549224 doi
Access Restriction:
Restricted for use by site license.