Franklin

Maximum Feasible Participation : American Literature and the War on Poverty / Stephen Schryer.

Author/Creator:
Schryer, Stephen, author., Author,
Publication:
Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press, [2020]
Series:
Post*45
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (256 pages)
Subjects:
American literature -- Minority authors -- History and criticism.
American literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism.
Literature and society -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Literature and state -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Poverty -- Government policy -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Local subjects:
American literature. (search)
Community Action Program. (search)
War on Poverty. (search)
aesthetics. (search)
culture of poverty. (search)
process art. (search)
social work. (search)
welfare state. (search)
Language:
In English.
System Details:
Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.
text file PDF
Summary:
This book traces American writers' contributions and responses to the War on Poverty. Its title comes from the 1964 Opportunity Act, which established a network of federally funded Community Action Agencies that encouraged "maximum feasible participation" by the poor. With this phrase, the Johnson administration provided its imprimatur for an emerging model of professionalism that sought to eradicate boundaries between professionals and their clients-a model that appealed to writers, especially African Americans and Chicanos/as associated with the cultural nationalisms gaining traction in the inner cities. These writers privileged artistic process over product, rejecting conventions that separated writers from their audiences. "Participatory professionalism," however, drew on a social scientific conception of poverty that proved to be the paradigm's undoing: the culture of poverty thesis popularized by Oscar Lewis, Michael Harrington, and Daniel Moynihan. For writers and policy experts associated with the War on Poverty, this thesis described the cultural gap that they hoped to close. Instead, it eventually led to the dismantling of the welfare state. Ranging from the 1950s to the present, the book explores how writers like Jack Kerouac, Amiri Baraka, Gwendolyn Brooks, Oscar Zeta Acosta, Alice Walker, Philip Roth, and others exposed the War on Poverty's contradictions during its heyday and kept its legacy alive in the decades that followed.
Contents:
Frontmatter
Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction. Maximum Feasible Participation
1. Jack Kerouac's Delinquent Art
2. Black Arts and the Great Society
3. Legal Services and the Cockroach Revolution
4. Writing Urban Crisis after Moynihan
5. Civil Rights and the Southern Folk Aesthetic
6. Who Belongs in the University?
Conclusion. Working-Class Community Action
Notes
Bibliography
Index
Notes:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed 23. Jul 2020)
Contributor:
De Gruyter.
Contained In:
De Gruyter University Press Library.
ISBN:
9781503606081
Publisher Number:
10.1515/9781503606081 doi
Access Restriction:
Restricted for use by site license.
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