Franklin

Advances in cancer research. Volume one hundred and thirty / edited by Kenneth D. Tew, Paul B. Fisher.

Edition:
First edition.
Publication:
Amsterdam, [Netherlands] : Academic Press, 2016.
Series:
Advances in Cancer Research
Advances in Cancer Research ; Volume 130
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (327 p.)
Subjects:
Cancer -- Research.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Contents:
Front Cover; Advances in Cancer Research; Copyright; Contents; Contributors; Chapter One: The Evolving, Multifaceted Roles of Autophagy in Cancer; 1. Introduction; 2. Overview of Autophagy; 2.1. Molecular Machinery of Autophagosome Biogenesis; 2.1.1. Initiation of Autophagosome Biogenesis by the ULK Complex; 2.1.2. Nucleation of the Phagophore by the Class III PI3K Complex; 2.1.3. Elongation of the Phagophore by the mAtg12 and LC3 Conjugation Systems; 2.2. Fusion; 2.3. Regulation of Mammalian Autophagy; 2.3.1. Nutrient and Growth Factor Starvation; 2.3.2. Hypoxia; 2.3.3. Oxidative Stress
2.3.4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress2.3.5. DNA Damage; 2.3.6. Ionizing Radiation; 2.3.7. Immune System Activation; 2.3.8. Tumor Suppressor p53; 2.3.9. Epigenetic Modifications and mRNA Silencing; 2.4. Selective Capture of Autophagic Cargo in Mammals; 3. Tumor-Suppressive Roles for Autophagy in Cancer; 3.1. Genetic Basis for the Involvement of Autophagy in Tumor Suppression; 3.2. Inhibition of p62-Mediated Signaling Pathways; 3.3. Activation of Oncogene-Induced Senescence; 3.4. Maintenance of Immune Surveillance and Avoidance of Inflammation
3.5. Clearance of Defective Mitochondria and Maintenance of Genomic Integrity3.6. Autophagy-Inducing Agents in Cancer Therapy; 4. Tumor-Promoting Roles for Autophagy in Cancer; 4.1. Genetic Evidence for the Involvement of Autophagy in Tumor Promotion; 4.2. Autophagy Supports Metabolic Adaptation to Accommodate Increased Biosynthetic Needs; 4.3. Survival Programs, Therapeutic Resistance, and Tumor Dormancy; 4.4. Interaction with the Tumor Microenvironment; 4.5. Autophagy-Inhibiting Agents in Cancer Therapy; 5. New Intersections Between Autophagy and Secretion
5.1. Evidence for Autophagy-Dependent Secretion5.2. Emerging Roles for Autophagy-Dependent Secretion in Cancer; 6. Concluding Remarks and Perspectives; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter Two: Inhibitors of DNA Methylation, Histone Deacetylation, and Histone Demethylation: APerfect Combination for Ca...; 1. Introduction; 2. DNMTs: The Enzymes Responsible for DNA Methylation; 3. DNA-Demethylating Agents; 4. Azacytidine in RNA Metabolism; 5. Histone Acetylation; 5.1. Histone Deacetylases; 5.1.1. Class IHDACs; 5.1.2. Class II HDACs; 5.1.3. Class IV HDAC; 6. Nuclear Repressive Complexes
6.1. Nucleosome Remodeling and Deacetylase Complex: ALink Between DNA Methylation, Histone Deacetylation, and Nucleosome ...6.2. NCoR and SMRT Corepressor Complex; 6.3. Corepressor of RE1-Silencing Transcription Factor (CoREST) Repressor Complex; 7. HDAC Inhibitors: General Mechanism of Zinc Chelators; 7.1. Mechanisms of HDAC-Induced Anticancer Effects; 7.2. Hydroxamic Acid-Based Inhibitors: Vorinostat and Panobinostat; 7.3. Benzamide-Based HDAC Inhibitor: Entinostat; 7.4. Cyclic Tetrapeptide-Based Inhibitor: Romidepsin
7.5. Biomarkers of Response to HDAC Inhibition and Prognostic Indications
Notes:
Description based upon print version of record.
Includes bibliographical references at the end of each chapters and index.
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (ebrary, viewed April 22, 2016).
Contributor:
Tew, Kenneth D., editor.
Fisher, Paul B., editor.
ISBN:
0-12-805181-7
0-12-804789-5
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