Franklin

The Imitative Mind : Development, Evolution and Brain Bases.

Author/Creator:
Meltzoff, Andrew N.
Publication:
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (365 pages)
Series:
Cambridge Studies in Cognitive and Perceptual Development
Cambridge Studies in Cognitive and Perceptual Development ; v.6
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Subjects:
Imitation.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
This 2002 volume provides a summary of the research on imitation in both Europe and America.
Contents:
Cover
Half-title
Series-title
Title
Copyright
Contents
Contributors
Acknowledgments
An introduction to the imitative mind and brain
Introduction
Scope
Contexts
Issues
How are actions perceived?
How can similarity be effective between perception and action?
Approaches
Sensorimotor views
Cognitive views
Overview of the volume
References
Part I Developmental and evolutionary approaches to imitation
1 Elements of a developmental theory of imitation
Information in an imitative act
Mirror neurons and development
Imitation and experience
Facial imitation: innate observation-execution links
AIM mechanism
Imitation and identity: the uses of infant imitation
Speech perception and production
Mapping sound to sight
Mapping sound to production:vocal imitation
Speech as a supramodal representation
Object imitation and memory
Memory without language
Roots of theory of mind and intersubjectivity
Goals and intentions
People versus things
Grounding a theory of mind
Concluding remarks on the importance of imitation in human development
Imitation and cross-modal coordination
Imitation and memory
Imitation as a precursor to theory of mind
Innate structure combined with developmental change
Acknowledgements
Note
References
2 Imitation and imitation recognition: Functional use in preverbal infants and nonverbal children with autism
Introduction
Two options in developmental studies: search for precursors or search for adaptive behaviors
Imitation and the developing child
Preverbal children use imitation to communicate
The imitative language and the developing mind
The imitative language: a functional achievement of the "like-me mechanism"?
Early detection of nonimitative and imitative contingency.
Specific responses signaling imitation recognition
Imitation in low-functioning children with autism
Implicit and explicit recognition of being imitated in low-functioning children with autism
The imitative language: intentional primitives
Final comments
Imitation as a language: a developmental role for a transitory function?
Note
References
3 Self-awareness, other-awareness, and secondary representation
Synchronic imitation and secondary representation
Mirror self-recognition and secondary representation
The main hypothesis
Evidence for the hypothesis in the literature
Two empirical tests of the synchrony hypothesis
Recent related studies
Conclusion
References
4 Notes on individual differences and the assumed elusiveness of neonatal imitation
Where to start
Function
Remaining issue: Individual differences
Short-term stability
Long-term stability
Imitation and temperament
Imitation and the early relationship
Deferred imitation
Putting it all together
Acknowledgements
References
5 Ego function of early imitation
Mirrors as perfect imitators
Action repetition and self-exploration
Putative determinants of early self-objectification
Functional pleasure of self-produced action
Unique perceptual experience gained from self-produced action
Postural immaturity as a constraint toward action repetition
Contemplative stance arising from repeated actions
Summary and conclusion
Acknowledgments
References
6 The imitator's representation of the imitated: Ape and child
The imitation we are studying
The methodological approach: Ethology and experimentation
Imitating the shape and sequencing of actions
Imitation of hierarchical structure
Identifying imitation of hierarchical structure: Experimental rationale
The Study.
Imitation relative to self
Non-visual feedback: Chimpanzee Do-as-I-do ("DAID") experiments
Visual feedback: difficulties in autistic children
General discussion
Types of Imitation
Powerful methods
The imitator's representation of the imitated
The integration of imitative and nonimitative information
Note
Acknowledgements
References
7 Seeing actions as hierarchically organized structures: Great ape manual skills
Great ape manual skills
Program-level imitation
Understanding structure by watching fluid action
Concluding thoughts
Notes
Acknowledgements
References
Part II Cognitive approaches to imitation, body scheme, and perception-action coding
8 Experimental approaches to imitation
Framework
Nineteenth century: Lotze and James on ideomotor action
Twentieth century: Greenwald on ideomotor compatibility
Experimental investigations
Movement reproduction
Movement selection
Movement initiation
Movement production
Conclusions
References
9 Imitation: Common mechanisms in the observation and execution of finger and mouth movements
Introduction
The transformation problem of imitation: How can we do what we see?
Common neurocognitive mechanisms for perception and action
Recent experimental findings of common perception-action mechanisms in imitation
Evidence from stimulus-response compatibility paradigms
Comparing symbolic, spatial, and imitative finger cues
Matching observed and to-be-executed mouth movements
Concluding remarks
Summary
Theoretical aspects of a direct matching system
Limitations of a direct matching system
Notes
Acknowledgements
References
10 Goal-directed imitation
Perceiving and inferring goals in imitation
Distinguishing goals from outcomes
Goal-directed gestural imitation
The hand-to-ear task.
The goal-directed view
Testing the goal-directed view
Testing alternative hypotheses
Flexibility, goals, and imitation
Objects in imitation and action
Goal hierarchies and goal competition
Goals as mental states
Acknowledgments
References
11 Visuomotor couplings in object-oriented and imitative actions
Introduction
Actions and parameters
From object-guided to model-guided actions
Visuomotor couplings in action perception and imitation
Neurophysiology of action observation
Neurophysiology of action imitation
Neuropsychology of imitation
Behavioral evidence
Concluding remarks
Acknowledgments
References
12 On bodies and events
Structure of categories
Defining features or family resemblance?
Typicality
Basic level
Part structure and the basic level
Qualities of different kinds of categories
Bodies and events
Bodies
Body-part verification times
Events
Implications for imitation
Interweaving categories: objects, bodies, events, and scenes
Acknowledgments
References
13 What is the body schema?
What is the body schema?
Neurological evidence for body-specific representations
Sensory contributions to body representations
Are body representations different from other object representations?
Contributions of body representations to perception and behavior
Conclusions
References
Part III Neuroscience underpinnings of imitation and apraxia
14 From mirror neurons to imitation: Facts and speculations
Introduction
Functional properties of area F5
Motor properties
Visual properties
Mirror neurons
Resonance mechanisms
Low-level resonance mechanism and response facilitation
High-level resonance mechanism, emulation, and "true imitation"
Notes
Acknowledgments
References.
15 Cell populations in the banks of the superior temporal sulcus of the macaque and imitation
Introduction
Response properties of STSa cells tuned to the analysis of actions: examples of viewer-centered coding
Limb movements
Examples of object-centered coding for actions
Object-centered coding for the articulation of a part of the body
Object-centered coding for whole-body articulations
Goal-related coding for actions
From the perception of actions to the production of actions
References
16 Is there such a thing as functional equivalence between imagined, observed, and executed action?
What do we mean by action?
Behavioral evidence for perception of actions
Neurophysiological evidence for perception of actions
Behavioral evidence for mental simulation of actions
Neurophysiological evidence for perception of actions
Behavioral evidence for mental simulation of actions
Neurophysiological evidence for mental simulation of actions
Discussion
Conclusion
References
17 The role of imitation in body ownership and mental growth
Attention
Neuropsychology of imitation
Self-imitation
Development
Action coding of percepts
Infant imitation
Imitation as uninhibited perception
Body ownership
Unilateral neglect
Distortions of body sensation
Emerging sense of body ownership
Rhythms and social behavior
Concluding remarks
References
18 Imitation, apraxia, and hemisphere dominance
Introduction
Apraxia and motor execution
Kinematic analysis of imitation
Kinematics of prehension movements in LBD and RBD
Visuo-imitative apraxia
A direct route for imitation
Imitation and conceptual knowledge about the human body
Imitation of hand and finger postures
Matching and imitation of hand and finger postures
The human body as a mechanical device.
Conclusion.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local notes:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2021. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Contributor:
Prinz, Wolfgang.
Butterworth, George.
Hatano, Giyoo.
Fischer, Kurt W.
Greenfield, Patricia M.
Harris, Paul.
Stern, Daniel.
Other format:
Print version: Meltzoff, Andrew N. The Imitative Mind
ISBN:
9781139147378
9780521806855
OCLC:
57123436