Franklin

Jim and Jap Crow : A Cultural History of 1940s Interracial America.

Author/Creator:
Briones, Matthew M.
Publication:
Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2012.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (278 pages)
Status/Location:
Loading...

Options
Location Notes Your Loan Policy

Details

Subjects:
Kikuchi, Charles. -- Kikuchi diary.
Tanforan Assembly Center (San Bruno, Calif.).
Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945.
Japanese Americans -- California -- Biography.
Race discrimination -- United States -- History -- 20th century.
Japanese Americans -- Social conditions -- 20th century.
African Americans -- Social conditions -- To 1964.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
Following Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, the U.S. government rounded up more than one hundred thousand Japanese Americans and sent them to internment camps. One of those internees was Charles Kikuchi. In thousands of diary pages, he documented his experiences in the camps, his resettlement in Chicago and drafting into the Army on the eve of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and his postwar life as a social worker in New York City. Kikuchi's diaries bear witness to a watershed era in American race relations, and expose both the promise and the hypocrisy of American democracy. Jim and Jap Crow follows Kikuchi's personal odyssey among fellow Japanese American intellectuals, immigrant activists, Chicago School social scientists, everyday people on Chicago's South Side, and psychologically scarred veterans in the hospitals of New York. The book chronicles a remarkable moment in America's history in which interracial alliances challenged the limits of the elusive democratic ideal, and in which the nation was forced to choose between civil liberty and the fearful politics of racial hysteria. It was an era of world war and the atomic bomb, desegregation in the military but Jim and Jap Crow elsewhere in America, and a hopeful progressivism that gave way to Cold War paranoia. Jim and Jap Crow looks at Kikuchi's life and diaries as a lens through which to observe the possibilities, failures, and key conversations in a dynamic multiracial America.
Contents:
Cover
Title
Copyright
Acknowledgments
Preface: "Contraction and Release"
Introduction An Age of Possibility
Chapter 1. Before Pearl Harbor: Taking the Measure of a "Marginal" Man
Chapter 2. "A Multitude of Complexes": Finding Common Ground with Louis Adamic
Chapter 3. "Unity within Diversity": Intimacies and Public Discourses of Race and Ethnicity
Chapter 4. "Participating and Observing": Dorothy Swaine Thomas, W. I. Thomas, and JERS
Chapter 5. The Tanforan and Gila Diaries: Becoming Nikkei
Chapter 6. From "Jap Crow" to "Jim and Jane Crow": Black and Blue (and Yellow) in Chicago and the Bay Area
Chapter 7. "It Could Just as Well Be Me": Japanese American and African American GIs in the Army Diary
Conclusion Tatsuro, "Standing Man"
Notes
Index.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local notes:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2021. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Other format:
Print version: Briones, Matthew M. Jim and Jap Crow
ISBN:
9781400842216
9780691161938
OCLC:
775872995