Franklin

Hired Guns : Views About Armed Contractors in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

Author/Creator:
Cotton, Sarah K.
Publication:
Santa Monica : RAND Corporation, The, 2010.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (133 pages)
Status/Location:
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Subjects:
Postwar reconstruction -- Iraq -- Evaluation.
Private military companies -- Iraq -- Evaluation.
Private security services -- Iraq -- Evaluation.
Government contractors -- Iraq -- Evaluation.
Contracting out -- Iraq -- Evaluation.
Government contractors -- United States -- Evaluation.
Contracting out -- United States -- Evaluation.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
This study reports the results of a systematic, empirically based survey of opinions of U.S. military and State Department personnel with Iraq war experience to shed light on the costs and benefits of using private security contractors (PSCs) in the Iraq war. For the most part, respondents did not believe that PSCs were "running wild" in Iraq, but they held mixed views on PSCs' contribution to the U.S. military operation and U.S. foreign policy objectives.
Contents:
Intro
Cover
Title Page
Copyright
Preface
Contents
Figures
Tables
Summary
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Chapter One: Introduction
What Are the Costs and Benefits of Armed Contractors to the U.S. Mission in Iraq?
Our Approach
Survey Instrument Development, Sampling Procedures, and Other Data Sources
Roadmap of the Monograph
Chapter Two: Private Military and Security Contractors in Operation Iraqi Freedom
Private Military and Security Contractors in Operation Iraqi Freedom
Contractors' Legal Status Is Opaque
Chapter Three: Do Private Security Contractors Have a Negative Impact on Military Retention and Morale?
Military and Diplomatic Personnel Tend to View Armed Contractors as Having a Detrimental Impact on Military Retention and Morale
Chapter Four: Have Private Security Contractors Had an Adverse Effect on Local Iraqis' Perceptions of the Entire Occupying Force Because of the Legal Impunity with Which They Operated in Iraq Prior to 2009?
Confirmed Incidents of Armed Contractors Firing on Iraqi Civilians
Most Military and Diplomatic Personnel Do Not View Armed Contractors as "Running Wild" in Iraq, but a Considerable Number of Both Groups Do Report Troubling Incidents Involving Poor PSC Behavior Toward Iraqi Civilians
Reforms Appear to Have Had a Positive Impact Thus Far
Chapter Five: Is There a Relative Lack of Unit Cohesion and Systematic Coordination Between Private Security Contractors and the Military?
Sizable Minorities of Military and Diplomatic Personnel Indicate That Coordination Problems Between Contractors and the Military Are Not Absent
Chapter Six: Do Private Security Contractors Play a Valuable Supporting Role to the U.S. Military as a Force Multiplier?.
Both Military and Diplomatic Personnel Tend to View Armed Contractors as Force Multipliers, but a Considerable Minority of Respondents Feels Differently
Chapter Seven: Do Private Security Contractors Provide Skills and Services That the Armed Forces Lack?
Military and Diplomatic Personnel Tend to View Armed Contractors as Providing Valuable Skills
Chapter Eight: Do Private Security Contractors Provide Vital Surge Capacity and Critical Security Services?
Military and Diplomatic Personnel Tend to View Armed Contractors as Providing Necessary Surge Capacity and Critical Security Services
Chapter Nine: Summary of Findings and Policy Recommendations
Recommendations
Duties Best Filled by Contractors
A. Methodology
B. Screen Shots of Final Survey as Fielded to Members of the Military
C. Screen Shots of Final Survey as Fielded to State Department Personnel
References.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local notes:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2021. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Contributor:
Petersohn, Ulrich.
Dunigan, Molly.
Burkhart, Q.
Zander-Cotugno, Megan.
Other format:
Print version: Cotton, Sarah K. Hired Guns
ISBN:
9780833050755
9780833049827
OCLC:
676695801