Franklin

One Hundred Semesters : My Adventures As Student, Professor, and University President, and What I Learned along the Way.

Other records:
Author/Creator:
Chace, William M.
Publication:
Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2009.
Series:
The William G. Bowen Ser.
The William G. Bowen Ser. ; v.47
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (257 pages)
Subjects:
Chace, William M.
Education, Higher -- United States.
Universities and colleges -- United States.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
In One Hundred Semesters, William Chace mixes incisive analysis with memoir to create an illuminating picture of the evolution of American higher education over the past half century. Chace follows his own journey from undergraduate education at Haverford College to teaching at Stillman, a traditionally African-American college in Alabama, in the 1960s, to his days as a professor at Stanford and his appointment as president of two very different institutions--Wesleyan University and Emory University. Chace takes us with him through his decades in education--his expulsion from college, his boredom and confusion as a graduate student during the Free Speech movement at Berkeley, and his involvement in three contentious cases at Stanford: on tenure, curriculum, and academic freedom. When readers follow Chace on his trip to jail after he joins Stillman students in a civil rights protest, it is clear that the ideas he presents are born of experience, not preached from an ivory tower. The book brings the reader into both the classroom and the administrative office, portraying the unique importance of the former and the peculiar rituals, rewards, and difficulties of the latter. Although Chace sees much to lament about American higher education--spiraling costs, increased consumerism, overly aggressive institutional self-promotion and marketing, the corruption of intercollegiate sports, and the melancholy state of the humanities--he finds more to praise. He points in particular to its strength and vitality, suggesting that this can be sustained if higher education remains true to its purpose: providing a humane and necessary education, inside the classroom and out, for America's future generations.
Contents:
Intro
Table of Contents
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Introduction
1 I Knew Exactly What I Was Doing
2 Haverford - the Guilty Reminder
3 And All Will Be Well
4 The Readiness Is All
5 Berkeley: Thoroughly Unready
6 The Discipline of Literature
7 A New Kind of Proletariat
8 Going South
9 Reading in Jail
10 Poetry and Politics
11 The Storehouse of Knowledge
12 Unfolding the Origami of Teaching
13 Tenure and Its Discontents
14 Tenure Tested
15 Teaching and Its Discontents
16 The English Department in Disarray
17 Why Join the Administration?
18 Exchanging Reflection for Action
19 Diversity University
20 Marching to a Different Drummer
21 The Puzzle of Leadership
22 Looking at Success
Looking at Failure
23 Learning and Then Leaving
24 A School with Aspirations
25 Being a Proprietor
26 Real Power and Imaginary Power
27 A King of Infinite Space.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local notes:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2021. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Contributor:
Chace, William M. M.
Other format:
Print version: Chace, William M. One Hundred Semesters
ISBN:
9781400827305
9780691127255
OCLC:
334886297
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