Franklin

Education in Ethiopia : Strengthening the Foundation for Sustainable Progress.

Author/Creator:
Bank, World.
Publication:
Washington : World Bank Publications, 2005.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (340 pages)
Edition:
1st ed.
Status/Location:
Loading...

Options
Location Notes Your Loan Policy

Details

Subjects:
Education -- Ethiopia.
Ethiopia.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
With the end of civil war in 1991, Ethiopia’s government launched a New Education and Training Policy in 1994 which, by the early 2000s, had already produced remarkable results. The gross enrollment ratio rose from 20 to 62 percent in primary education between 1993-94 and 2001-02; and in secondary and higher education it climbed, respectively, from 8 to 12 percent and from 0.5 to 1.7 percent. Yet the government can hardly afford to rest on its laurels. Primary education is still not universal, and already there are concerns about plummeting educational quality and the growing pressures to expand post-primary education. Addressing these challenges will require more resources, both public and private. Yet money alone is insufficient. Focusing on primary and secondary education, Education in Ethiopia argues for wise tradeoffs in the use of resources—a result that will often require reforming the arrangements for service delivery. These changes, in turn, need to be fostered by giving lower levels of government more leeway to adapt central standards—such as those for teacher recruitment and school construction—to local conditions, including local resource constraints; and by strengthening accountability for results at all levels of administration in the education system.
Contents:
Intro
Contents
Foreword
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations and Acronyms
Executive Summary
Designing the Overall Policy Framework
Getting Resources to Schools, Communities, and Households
Taking Advantage of Decentralization to Get Results
Conclusion
1. Demography, Economy, and Government Finance
Demographic and Social Conditions
Economic Conditions
Pattern of Government Finance
Conclusion
2. Enrollments and Patterns of Student Flow
Structure of the Education System
Overview of Enrollment Trends
Enrollments in Government and Nongovernment Establishments
Evening Classes, Distance Education, and Nonformal Basic Education
Trends and Levels in the Gross Enrollment Ratio
Student Flow in Primary and Secondary Education
Issues for Policy Development
Conclusion
3. Education Expenditures
Overall Pattern of Recurrent Public Spending on Education
A Closer Look at Recurrent Public Spending on Education in 2001-02
Public Spending Per Student by Level and Type of Education
Household Spending on Education
Issues for Policy Development
Conclusion
4. Disparities in Enrollments, Student Flow, and Benefit Incidence
Overview of Participation Rates
Disparities in Student Flow Patterns in Primary Education
Distribution of Public Spending on Education
Issues for Policy Development
Conclusion
5. Service Delivery in Primary and Secondary Education
Overview of the Network of Schools
Selected Characteristics of Schools
Staffing Patterns
Teacher Allocation across Government Schools
Economies of Scale in Service Delivery
Student Achievement
Issues for Policy Development
Conclusion
6. Aspects of the Market and Nonmarket Benefits of Schooling
Employment Patterns and Workers' Educational Attainment
The Market Returns to Education.
The Impact of Education on Poverty and Nonmarket Outcomes
Issues for Policy Development
Conclusion
APPENDIXES
Technical Note 1: Preparation of the Data on Current Public Expenditure on Education in Ethiopia
Technical Note 2: Estimating Student Flow Profiles
Technical Note 3: Selected Studies on Rates of Return to Education in Ethiopia
Appendix Tables
References
LIST OF TABLES
1 Low Rates of Entry to Grade 1 and Survival to Grade 4, Especially in Rural Areas, despite Unambiguous Overall Improvement since 1993-94
2 High Teacher Cost Leads to Adverse Tradeoff against Other School Inputs in Ethiopia
3 Scope Exists for Increasing the Efficiency of Time Use by Teachers beyond Grade 4
4 Possible Indicators for Monitoring Progress in Primary Education in Ethiopia
5 Urban-Rural Disparities in Primary School Participation are Especially Wide in Ethiopia
6 Primary Schools are Still Too Inaccessible for Many Children in Rural Ethiopia
7 Incompleteness of Instructional Program Characterizes Many Rural Primary Schools
8 The Direct Cost of Primary Schooling Can Be Significant for the Poorest Families
1.1 Selected Population Characteristics, Ethiopia, 1984 to 1999-2000
1.2 Selected Health Indicators, Ethiopia, 1984 to 1999-2000
1.3 Percentage of Children below 15 Years of Age Who Have Lost One or Both Parents, Ethiopia and Other African Countries, circa 1999
1.4 Sources of Recent Economic Growth, Ethiopia, 1992-93 to 1999-2000
1.5 Trends in Overall Government Revenues, Ethiopia, 1980-81 to 2001-02
1.6 Trends in Total Government Expenditure, Ethiopia, 1980-81 to 2001-02
1.7 Trends in Public Spending on Education, Ethiopia, 1980-81 to 2001-02
2.1 Enrollments by Level in Government and Nongovernment Institutions, Ethiopia, 1967-68 to 2001-02.
2.2 Number of Students by Type and Level of Education, Ethiopia, 2001-02
2.3 Primary Gross Enrollment Ratios (GER), Ethiopia, 1993-94 to 2001-02
2.4 Three Indicators of Entry to Grade 1, Ethiopia, 1993-94 to 2000-01
2.5 Cohort Survival Rates Using Different Estimation Methods, Ethiopia, 2000-01
2.6 Composite Cohort Survival Rates and Intercycle Transition Rates, Ethiopia, 1993-94 and circa 2000-01
2.7 Repetition Rates and Share of Readmitted Students among Repeaters, Ethiopia, 1993-93 and 2002-03
2.8 Efficiency of Student Flow in Primary Education, Ethiopia, 1993-94 and 2001-02
2.9 Enrollments in Grades 8-12 in Government and Nongovernment Schools, Ethiopia, 1999-2000 to 2002-03
2.10 Possible Indicators for Monitoring Progress in Primary Education in Ethiopia
3.1 Regional Distribution of School-Age Population and Recurrent Public Spending on Education, Ethiopia, 1993-94 to 2001-02
3.2 Recurrent Public Education Spending Trends and Composition by Subsector, Ethiopia, 1993-94 to 2001-02
3.3 Regional Recurrent Spending on Education, and Amount and Share of Spending on Administration, Ethiopia, 2001-02
3.4 Regional Recurrent Spending on Primary, Secondary, and Technical
3.5 Distribution of Teachers in Government Schools by Level of Teaching Assigned, Certification, and Average Age, Ethiopia, circa 2002
3.6 Average Annual Teacher Remuneration and Aggregate Spending on Teachers and Administrative Staff in Government Schools, Ethiopia, 2001-02
3.7 Number of Academic and Administrative Staff, Their Average Remuneration and Aggregate Wage Bill in Teacher Training and Higher Education, Ethiopia, 2001-02
3.8 Recurrent Public Spending on Education by Function and Level, Ethiopia, 2001-02
3.9 Recurrent Spending on Primary and Secondary Education across Regions, Ethiopia, 2001-02.
3.10 Teacher Wages and Educational Supplies as a Percentage of Recurrent Spending in Primary and Secondary Education across Regions. Ethiopia. 2001-02
3.11 Public Recurrent Spending Per Student by Level and Type of Education
3.12 Public Spending Per Student in Government Primary and Secondary Schools across Regions, Ethiopia, 2001-02
3.13 Estimates of Teaching Loads by Level of Education, Ethiopia, 2001-02
3.14 Sources of Differences in Spending Per Student in Government Primary and Secondary Education, Ethiopia, 2001-02
3.15 Sources of Regional Differences in Spending Per Student in Grades 1-4 and Grades 5-8 Across Regions, Ethiopia, 2001-02
3.16 Sources of Differences in Government Spending Per Student across Cycles in Primary Education in Each Region, Ethiopia, 2001-02
3.17 Household Spending on Education by Level, Ethiopia, circa 2000
3.18 Aggregate Household Spending on Education, Ethiopia, 1999-00
3.19 National Spending on Education, Ethiopia, 1999-2000
3.20 Household Spending Per Child in Primary School by Household Consumption
3.21 Public Recurrent Spending Per Primary Pupil, Teacher Wages, Pupil-Teacher Ratios, and Spending on Inputs Other Than Teachers, Ethiopia and Selected World Regions, circa 2000
3.22 Teacher's Weekly Teaching Hours by Level of Education, Ethiopia (2001-02) and Other Countries (1999)
3.23 Teacher's Weekly Teaching Hours by Level of Education, Ethiopia (2001-2) and Other Countries (1999)
4.1 Gross Enrollment Ratios by Region, Ethiopia, 1993-94 and 2001-02
4.2 Gross Enrollment Ratios by Locality, Gender, and Wealth, Ethiopia, 1999-2000
4.3 Female Share of Primary and Secondary Enrollments across Regions
4.4 Percentage of Children Ages 7-14 Currently Enrolled in Primary School by Orphanhood Status, Ethiopia, 1999-2000.
4.5 Student Flow Indicators in Primary Education by Gender
4.6 Social Selectivity in Primary Education according to Three Cross-Sectional Indicators of Access, Ethiopia and Sub-Saharan African Countries, circa 2000
4.7 Benefit Incidence of Public Spending on Education, Ethiopia, circa 2000
4.8 Share of Public Spending on Education Benefiting the Poorest and Richest Population Quintiles, Ethiopia (1999-2000) and Other Countries (1990s)
4.9 Distribution of Children Ages 7-14 and Their School Participation Rates by Distance to Nearest Primary School, Ethiopia, 2000
4.10 Percentage of Children Ages 7 to 14 Years Currently Registered for School, by Mother's Native Language, Ethiopia, 2000
5.1 Distribution of Primary and Secondary Students and Schools
5.2 Distribution of Government and Nongovernment Schools
5.3 Percentage Distribution of Government and Nongovernment Primary Schools by Date of Establishment, Ethiopia, 2001-02
5.4 Distribution of Government Primary Schools by Highest Grade
5.5 Prevalence of Double Shifting and Section and School Sizes of Government
5.6 Selected Indicators of Conditions in Government and Nongovernment
5.7 Administrative Staff Allocation and Staffing Ratios across Primary
5.8 Distribution of Teachers by Gender and Qualification in Government and Nongovernment Primary and Secondary Schools, Ethiopia, 2001-02
5.9 Pupil-Teacher Ratios by Level of Instruction in Government and Nongovernment Schools across Regions, Ethiopia, 2001-02
5.10 Percentage Distribution of Government and Nongovernment Schools by Range of Pupil-Teacher ratios, Ethiopia, 2001-02
5.11 Regression Estimates of the Relation between Numbers of Teachers and Students across Government Schools by Level of Instruction, Ethiopia, 2001-02.
5.12 Regression Estimates of the Relation between Total Costs and Enrollments across Government Schools, Ethiopia, 2001-02.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Other format:
Print version: Bank, World Education in Ethiopia
ISBN:
9780821362273
9780821362266
OCLC:
507984047