Franklin

Helping Victims of Violent Crime : Assessment, Treatment, and Evidence-Based Practice.

Author/Creator:
Green, Diane L., PhD.
Publication:
New York : Springer Publishing Company, 2008.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (279 pages)
Edition:
1st ed.
Series:
Springer Series on Social Work
Springer Series on Social Work
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Subjects:
Victims of violent crimes -- Mental health.
Crisis intervention (Mental health services).
Evidence-based psychiatry.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
Over the past two decades, violent crime has become one of the most serious domestic problems in the United States. Approximately 13 million people (nearly 5% of the U.S. population) are victims of crime every year, and of that, approximately one and a half million are victims of violent crime. Ensuring quality of life for victims of crime is therefore a major challenge facing policy makers and mental health providers. Helping Victims of Violent Crime grounds victim assistance treatments in a victim-centered and strengths perspective. The book explores victim assistance through systems theory: the holistic notion of examining the client in his/her environment and a key theoretical underpinning of social work practice. The basic assumption of systems theory is homeostasis. A crime event causes a change in homeostasis and often results in disequilibrium. The victim's focus at this point is to regain equilibrium. Under the systems metatheory, coping, crisis and attribution theories provide a good framework for victim-centered intervention. Stress and coping theories posit that three factors determine the state of balance: perception of the event, available situational support, and coping mechanisms. Crisis theory offers a framework to understand a victim's response to a crime. The basic assumption of crisis theory asserts that when a crisis occurs, people respond with a fairly predictable physical and emotional pattern. The intensity and manifestation of this pattern may vary from individual to individual. Finally, attribution theory asserts that individuals make cognitive appraisals of a stressful situation in both positive and negative ways. These appraisals are based on the individual's assertion that they can understand, predict, and control circumstances and result in the victim's assignment of responsibility for solving or helping with
problems that have arisen from the crime event. In summary, these four theories can delineate a definitive model for approach to the victimization process. It is from this theoretical framework that Treating Victims of Violent Crime offers assessments and interventions with a fuller understanding of the victimization recovery process. The book includes analysis of victims of family violence (child abuse, elder abuse, partner violence) as well as stranger violence (sexual assault, homicide, and terrorism). ;chapter.
Contents:
Intro
Contents
About the Authors
Foreword
Preface
Acknowledgments
Chapter 1 Victims of Violent Crime: An Introduction
Scope of the Problem
Historical Perspective on Victimology
Victim Programs, Legislation, and Funding
Costs: Tangible and Human Costs of Victimization
Emotional, Physical, Financial, and Spiritual Impact
Systems Theoretical Framework
Systems Theory
Stress and Coping
Crisis and Attribution Theories: How Victims Experience Their Victimization
Crisis Theory
Attribution Theory
Summary of Theoretical Framework
Chapter 2 Grief and Loss Reactions and Theories
Overview, Definitions, and Common Grief Reactions
Grief Work, Stages and Phases
Teresa Rando
Robert Neimeyer
Bowlby and Parkes
Elisabeth K├╝bler-Ross
Which Theory Is Right?
Summary
Chapter 3 Stress and Coping Model for Victims of Crime
Appraisal
Social Support
Perceived and Received Social Support
Formal Social Support
Social Support as a Mediator and a Moderator
Coping
Coping as Mediator
Coping Dimensions
Well-Being
Distress
Depression
Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
Anger
Anxiety
Summary
Chapter 4 Crisis Intervention
History
Practice Models
Evidence-Based Practice Needs
Guidelines for Practice
Roberts's Seven-Stage Crisis Intervention Model (R-SSCIM)
Critical Incident Stress Management
Critical Incident Stress Debriefing
Requirements for Intervention
Conclusion
Chapter 5 Cases of Child Abuse
Assessment
Special Issues in Child Abuse Cases
Risk Factors
Assessment of Children, Parent/Caregiver-Child and Other Familial Relationships
Use of Standardized Measures
Summary of Assessment
Treatment: Issues and Interventions
Overview: General Principles of Treatment
Family-Centered Practice.
Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Additional Treatment Approaches
Summary of Treatment
Chapter 6 Intimate Partner Violence: Overview, Stages of Change, Crisis Intervention, and Time-Limited Treatment
Case Scenarios
Case 1: Cathy
Case 2: Julia
Case 3: Cynthia
Barriers to Seeking Help
Case 1
Case 2
Case 3
Case 4
Myths and Facts
23 Warning Signs of a Potentially Abusive Partner
Prevalence and Costs
Continuum of the Duration and Severity of Woman Battering Based on 501 Cases
Methodology
Findings
Duration and Severity Level of Woman-Battering Continuum
Practice Implications
Roberts's Seven-Stage Crisis Intervention Model
Conclusion
Chapter 7 Sexual Assault
Assessment
Special Issues in Sexual Assault Cases
Victim Assessment
Use of Standardized Measures
Treatment Planning
Summary of Assessment
Treatment: Issues and Interventions
Overview: General Principles of Treatment
Stress Inoculation Training
Prolonged Exposure Therapy
Cognitive Processing Therapy
Multiple Channel Exposure Therapy
Summary
Chapter 8 Homicide Victims
Assessment
Special Issues in Homicide Cases
Victim Assessment
Use of Standardized Measures
Treatment Planning
Summary of Assessment
Treatment: Issues and Interventions
Overview: General Principles of Treatment
Revictimization Issues
Grief Therapy and Meaning Reconstruction
Crisis Intervention
Stress Reduction Group
Conclusion
Chapter 9 Elder Abuse
Assessment
Special Issues and Assessment in Elder Abuse Cases
Summary of Assessment
Treatment: Issues and Interventions
Overview: General Principles of Treatment
Prevention/Treatment
Chapter 10 Terrorism/Mass Violence
Assessment
Special Issues in Mass Violence Cases
Victim Assessment.
Use of Standardized Measures
Treatment Planning
Treatment: Issues and Interventions
Overview: General Principles of Treatment
Early Intervention
Triage
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
Critical Incident Stress Management
Psychotraumatology
Chapter 11 School Violence: Crisis Intervention Protocols and Prevention Strategies
Introduction
Review of the Literature
Crisis Impacts and Treatment Issues for Children and Adolescents Experiencing School Violence and Community Disasters
School-Based Crisis Intervention
School Crisis Response Model
School-Based Crisis Teams
Summary
References
Index
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local notes:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2021. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Contributor:
Roberts, Albert R., DSW, PhD, BCETS, DACFE.
Other format:
Print version: Green, Diane L., PhD Helping Victims of Violent Crime
ISBN:
9780826125095
9780826125088
OCLC:
476262896