Franklin

Aptitude for Interpreting.

Author/Creator:
Pöchhacker, Franz.
Publication:
Amsterdam : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2014.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (189 pages)
Series:
Benjamins Current Topics
Benjamins Current Topics ; v.68
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Subjects:
Translating and interpreting -- Study and teaching.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
With increasing numbers of students wishing to become conference interpreters, but limited capacities in most university degree programs, accurate admission testing is an important means of predicting an applicant's chances of completing the program successfully. This article focuses on three aptitude tests for simultaneous interpretation: Pöchhacker's SynCloze test; Chabasse's cognitive shadowing test; and Timarová's personalized cloze test. The test battery was administered at the start of the 2009/2010 academic year to students beginning the two-year Master's program in conference interpreting (MA KD) at Germersheim. Correlations between test performance and subsequent exam grades at the end of the second semester were examined for all three tests. Given the large number of applicants each year, practical feasibility of the tests was taken into consideration with a view to scheduling the format and content of the entrance exam for the 2012/2013 academic year. In this perspective, cognitive shadowing was identified as the most useful test under the existing time constraints.
Contents:
Aptitude for Interpreting
Editorial page
Title page
LCC data
Table of contents
Aptitude for interpreting
References
Aptitude testing over the years
1. Introduction
2. What to look for in an interpreting candidate
2.1 Ideal interpreter profiles: A consistent view over a 40-year span
2.2 Other contributions to the debate
3. How to measure interpreter candidates' skills?
3.1 Types of tests
3.1.1 Early aptitude test batteries
3.1.2 More recent test battery descriptions
4. Test validity and reliability
4.1 Proposals for aptitude test designs
4.2 Predictive aptitude tests
5. Conclusions
References
Learning styles, motivation and cognitive flexibility in interpreter training
Introduction
Psychological traits: Learning styles, motivation and cognitive flexibility
Learning styles
Motivation
Cognitive flexibility
Methodology of aptitude and admission research
Lessius study programmes and student groups description
Analysis 1: Self-selection
Method
Results
Analysis 2: Prediction of successful completion of interpreter training
Method
Results
Discussion
References
A story of attitudes and aptitudes?
1. Introduction
2. Literature
2.1 ID variables in second language acquisition
2.2 ID variables in translation and interpreting studies
3. ID variables examined in this study
3.1 Linguistic self-confidence
3.2 Motivation
3.3 Language anxiety
4. Experiment
4.1 Participants
4.2 Method
4.3 Results
4.3.1 ID variables
4.3.2 The interpreting performance
4.3.3 Relating interpreting performance to ID variables
5. Conclusions and perspectives
References
Appendix 1: SPCC questionnaire
Appendix 2: Questionnaire based on AMTB
Cognitive and motivational contributors to aptitude
Introduction
Method.
Participants
Materials
Procedure
Results
Type: Signed language (SL) and spoken language (SP) group comparisons
Level: Entry-level (EL) and advanced-level (AL) group comparisons
Discussion
Limitations and future research
References
Evaluating emotional stability as a predictor of interpreter competence and aptitude for interpreting
Introduction
Literature review
Personality and job performance
Research on personality and interpreters
Self-efficacy, goal orientation and negative affectivity
Research hypotheses
Methodology
Participants
The instrument
Procedure
Results
Discussion and conclusions
Implications for interpreter education
References
Domain-general cognitive abilities and simultaneous interpreting skill
Introduction
Method
Participants
Rating
Measurements
Cognitive Ability Measurements
Emotion-Cognition Interaction Measurements
Procedure
Results and discussion
Univariate analyses
Multivariate analyses
Discussion
General discussion and future directions
References
Testing aptitude for interpreting
1. Introduction
2. Methods
2.1 Participants
2.2 Scoring
2.3 Outcome measures
2.4 Statistical analysis
3. Results
3.1 Scores on all variables
3.2 Correlation and regression analysis
3.2.1 Outcome measure: Examination mark
3.2.2 Outcome measure: Number of exam sessions
3.3 Sensitivity and specificity of tests
3.3.1 Low-mark and high-mark students
3.3.2 Slow and fast students
4. Discussion and conclusions
References
Assessing aptitude for interpreting
1. Introduction
1.1 Aptitude
1.2 Context
2. Approaches to aptitude assessment
2.1 Course-based assessment
2.2 Tests
3. SynCloze test
3.1 Sources
3.2 Rationale
3.3 Design
3.4 Administration
3.5 Scoring.
4. Findings
4.1 Beginners vs. interpreting students
4.2 Results by language profile
4.3 Response times
4.4 Results by cloze item
4.5 Correlation
5. Conclusions
References
Putting interpreting admissions exams to the test
1. Introduction
2. Interpreter aptitude testing
2.1 Aptitude and aptitude testing
2.2 Current testing at Germersheim
3. The new FTSK admission test
3.1 Piloting the new FTSK admission tests
3.1.1 Correlation parameters
3.1.2 Institutional considerations
3.2 Tests chosen for our candidates
3.2.1 Tests in the 'A' language (German)
3.2.2 Tests in the 'B' language (English, French, Italian)
Weighting
4. Results
4.1 Cognitive shadowing
4.2 SynCloze (A and B)
4.3 Personalized cloze
5. Discussion
6. Conclusions
References
About the authors
Subject index.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local notes:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2021. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Contributor:
Liu, Minhua.
Other format:
Print version: Pöchhacker, Franz Aptitude for Interpreting
ISBN:
9789027269546
9789027242563
OCLC:
892799166