Franklin

The American Direct Primary : Party Institutionalization and Transformation in the North.

Other records:
Author/Creator:
Ware, Alan.
Publication:
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (288 pages)
Subjects:
Primaries -- United States -- History.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
A major study of the origins of direct primary US elections since the 1920s.
Contents:
Cover
Half-title
Title
Copyright
Dedication
Contents
Tables
Abbreviations
Preface and Acknowledgments
1 Introduction
1. Patterns of Social Division and/or Political Ideology
2. Political Culture
3. Governmental Decentralization
4. Explaining the Rise of the Direct Primary
5. North and South
6. Institutionalization of the Parties
7. Organization of the Book
Section A
Section B
Section C
A HOW THE DIRECT PRIMARY AROSE
2 The Catalytic Effect of Ballot Reform
1. The Adoption of the Australian Ballot
2. Informal Procedures and the Problems of Scale
3. Reformers' Promotion of the Australian Ballot
4. Variants of the Australian Ballot in the United States
(i) Pure Office Block (POB)
(ii) Office Block Ballot with Straight Ticket Provision (OBSTP)
(iii) Pure Party Column (PPC)
(iv) Party Column without Box (PCB)
(v) "Shoestring" Ballot
5. The Positions of Reformers and Parties in Relation to the Types of Ballot Used
6. The Weakness of Opposition to the Australian Ballot
7. Success and Failure for the Antiparty Reformers
8. Ballot Reform and Interparty Competition
9. Concluding Remarks
3 Legal Control of Party Activity
1. Candidate Selection in the Nineteenth Century
2. The Problems With the Caucus-Convention System
(i) Participation
(ii) Logistics
(iii) Fraud
(iv) Control
(v) The Interconnections of the Four Factors
3. The Impact of the Australian Ballot
4. The 1898 National Conference
5. Why Legal Controls Over Parties were Introduced
6. Did Legal Control Turn Parties Into Public Utilities?
7. Concluding Remarks
4 The Spread of Direct Nominations
1. The Rising Popularity of the Crawford County System
2. The Rural and Midwestern Base of Direct Elections
3. The Impact of the Southern Experience.
4. Direct Nominations Move to the City: Cleveland
5. Statewide Legislation and the Direct Primary: Kentucky
6. The Legally Mandated Direct Primary in Minneapolis, 1899
7. The States Convert to Direct Primaries, 1903-15
8. Insurgency and Party Reform in Wisconsin
9. Concluding Remarks
B WHY THE DIRECT PRIMARY WAS INTRODUCED
5 Reformers versus Urban Machines?
1. Massachusetts
2. Pennsylvania
3. Missouri
4. Illinois
5. New York
6. Concluding Remarks
6 The Impact of Party Competition
1. Competition in the United States before the Mid-1890s
2. Party Competition after the Mid-1890s
3. Why the Democrats were Disadvantaged
4. Changes in Party Competition and the Rise of the Direct Primary
5. Competition as a Stimulant to Nomination Reform
6. Party Competition and Political Exclusion: Southern New England
7. Political Reform and the Direct Primary in Connecticut
8. Concluding Remarks
7 Explaining an "Irrational" Reform
1. The Constraint Imposed by Public Opinion
2. Reformers and the Invention of a "Solution"
(i) Logistics
(ii) Fraud
(iii) Control
(iv) Participation
3. Consensus Over the Direct Primary: The Case of New Jersey
4. Could the Parties Have Done More to Protect Themselves?
5. Concluding Remarks
C WHAT HAPPENED NEXT?
8 Reaction and Aftermath
1. Reaction Against the Direct Primary
2. The State of the Parties in 1930
3. The Delayed Impact of the Direct Primary
4. Changes in the Direct Primary Since the 1920s
5. The Direct Primary and the Presidential Primary
6. Concluding Remarks
9 Conclusions
Index.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local notes:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2021. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Other format:
Print version: Ware, Alan The American Direct Primary
ISBN:
9780511147777
9780521814928
OCLC:
70743311
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