Franklin

Steel Connection Analysis.

Author/Creator:
Rugarli, Paolo.
Publication:
Newark : John Wiley & Sons, Incorporated, 2018.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (549 pages)
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Subjects:
Steel, Structural-Testing.
Finite element method.
Building, Iron and steel-Joints.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Contents:
Intro
Title Page
Copyright
Contents
Preface
Chapter 1 Introduction
1.1 An Unsolved Problem
1.2 Limits of Traditional Approaches
1.2.1 Generality
1.2.2 Member Stress State Oversimplification
1.2.3 Single Constituent Internal Combined Effects Linearization
1.2.4 Single-Constituent External Combined-Effects Neglect
1.2.5 Neglecting Eccentricities
1.2.6 Use of Envelopes
1.2.7 Oversimplification of Plastic Mechanisms Evaluation
1.2.8 Evaluation of Buckling Phenomena
1.3 Some Limits of the Codes of Practice
1.3.1 Problem of Coded Standards
1.3.2 T-Stub in Eurocode 3
1.3.3 Eurocode 3 Component Model
1.3.4 Distribution of Internal Forces
1.3.5 Prying Forces
1.3.6 Block Tearing
1.4 Scope of This Book
1.5 Automatic Modeling and Analysis of 3D Connections
1.6 Acknowledgments
References
Chapter 2 Jnodes
2.1 BFEM
2.2 From the BFEM to the Member Model
2.2.1 Physical Model and the Analytical Model
2.2.2 Member Detection: Connection Codes
2.2.3 An Automatic Algorithm for Straight Prismatic Member Detection
2.2.4 Member Data Structure
2.2.5 Member Classification at a Node
2.2.6 Member Mutual Alignment Coding
2.3 Jnodes
2.3.1 Need for the Jnode Concept
2.3.2 Jnode Definition
2.4 Jnode Analytics
2.4.1 Classification of Jnodes
2.4.2 Simple Jnodes
2.4.3 Hierarchical Jnodes
2.4.4 Central Jnodes
2.4.5 Cuspidal Jnodes
2.4.6 Tangent Jnodes
2.4.7 Constraints
2.4.8 Summary of Jnode Classification
2.4.9 Setting Connection Codes: Examples
2.5 Equal Jnodes Detection
2.5.1 Toponode
2.5.2 Jnode Data Structure
2.5.3 Superimposable Member Couples
2.5.4 Criteria to Assess Jnodes Equality
2.5.5 Algorithm to Find Equal Jnodes
2.5.6 Examples
2.6 Structural Connectivity Indices
2.7 Particular Issues.
2.7.1 Symmetries
2.7.2 Splitting of Jnodes
2.7.3 Mutual Interaction of Different Jnodes, Jnode Clusters
2.7.4 Tolerances
2.8 Jclasses
References
Chapter 3 A Model for Connection
3.1 Terminology
3.2 Graphs of Connections
3.3 Subconstituents vs Layouts
3.4 Classification of Connections
Reference
Chapter 4 Renodes
4.1 From Jnode to Renode Concept
4.2 BREP Geometrical Description of 3D Objects
4.3 The Scene
4.3.1 Generality
4.3.2 Members
4.3.3 Typical Fittings
4.3.4 Connectors
4.4 Dual Geometry
4.5 Automatic Connection Detection
4.5.1 Faces in Contact
4.5.2 Bolt Layouts
4.5.3 Weld Layouts
4.6 Elementary Operations
4.7 Renode Logic and the Chains
4.7.1 Minimum Compliance Criteria for Renode Good Design
4.7.2 Chains
4.7.3 Finding Chains
4.8 Prenodes
4.9 After Scene Creation
Chapter 5 Pillars of Connection Analysis
5.1 Equilibrium
5.1.1 Generality
5.1.2 Statics of Free Rigid Bodies
5.2 Action Reaction Principle
5.3 Statics of Connections
5.3.1 Equilibrium of Members in Renodes: Proper and Dual Models
5.3.2 Force Packets for Compound Members
5.3.3 Primary Unknowns: Iso-, Hypo-, and Hyperconnectivity
5.4 Static Theorem of Limit Analysis
5.5 The Unsaid of the Engineering Simplified Methods
5.6 Missing Pillars of Connection Analysis
5.6.1 Buckling
5.6.2 Fracture
5.6.3 Slip
5.6.4 Fatigue
5.7 Analysis of Connections: General Path
References
Chapter 6 Connectors: Weld Layouts
6.1 Introduction
6.2 Considerations of Stiffness Matrix of Connectors
6.3 Introduction to Weld Layouts
6.4 Reference Systems and Stresses for Welds
6.5 Geometrical Limitations
6.5.1 Penetration Weld Layouts
6.5.2 Fillet Weld Layouts
6.6 Penetration-Weld Layouts (Groove Welds)
6.6.1 Generality.
6.6.2 Simple Methods to Evaluate the Stresses
6.6.3 Weld Layout Cross-Section Data
6.6.4 Stiffness Matrix
6.6.5 Special Models
6.6.6 Example
6.7 Fillet-Welds Weld Layouts
6.7.1 The Behavior of Fillet Welds
6.7.2 Numerical Tests of Fillet Welds in the Linear Range
6.7.3 The Stiffness Matrix of a Single Fillet Weld
6.7.4 Instantaneous Center of Rotation Method in 3D
6.7.5 Computing the Stresses in Fillet Welds from the Forces Applied to the Layout
6.7.6 Fillet Welds Using Contact and Friction
6.8 Mixed Penetration and Fillet Weld Layouts
References
Chapter 7 Connectors: Bolt Layouts and Contact
7.1 Introduction to Bolt Layouts
7.2 Bolt Sizes and Classes
7.3 Reference System and Stresses for Bolt Layouts
7.4 Geometrical Limitations
7.4.1 Eurocode 3
7.4.2 AISC 360-10
7.5 Not Preloaded Bolt Layouts (Bearing Bolt Layouts)
7.5.1 Shear and Torque
7.5.2 Axial Force and Bending
7.6 Preloaded Bolt Layouts (Slip Resistant Bolt Layouts)
7.6.1 Preloading Effects
7.6.2 Shear and Torque
7.6.3 Axial Force and Bending
7.7 Anchors
7.8 Stiffness Matrix of Bolt Layouts and of Single Bolts
7.8.1 Generality
7.8.2 Not Preloaded Bolts
7.8.3 Preloaded Bolts
7.8.4 Non-Linear Analysis of Bolts
7.9 Internal Force Distribution
7.9.1 General Method
7.9.2 Bearing Surface Method to Compute Forces in Bolts
7.9.3 Instantaneous Center of Rotation Method
7.9.4 Examples
7.10 Contact
References
Chapter 8 Failure Modes
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Utilization Factor Concept
8.3 About the Specifications
8.4 Weld Layouts
8.4.1 Generality
8.4.2 Penetration Weld Layouts
8.4.3 Fillet Weld Layouts
8.5 Bolt Layouts
8.5.1 Resistance of Bolt Shaft
8.5.2 Sliding and Resistance of No-Slip Connections.
8.5.3 Pull-Out of Anchors, or Failure of the Anchor Block
8.6 Pins
8.6.1 Eurocode 3
8.6.2 AISC 360-10
8.7 Members and Force Transferrers
8.7.1 Generality
8.7.2 Local Failure Modes
8.7.3 Fracture Failure Modes
8.7.4 Global Failure Modes
References
Chapter 9 Analysis: Hybrid Approach
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Some Basic Reminders About FEM Analysis of Plated-Structures
9.2.1 FEM Analysis as an Engineering Tool
9.2.2 Linear Models
9.2.3 Linear Buckling Analysis
9.2.4 Material Non-Linearity
9.2.5 Geometrical Non-Linearity
9.2.6 Contact Non-Linearity
9.2.7 Non-Linear Analysis Control
9.3 IRFEM
9.3.1 Goal
9.3.2 Hypotheses
9.3.3 Construction
9.3.4 Examples
9.3.5 Results
9.3.6 Remarks on the Use of IRFEM
9.4 Connector Checks
9.4.1 Weld Checks
9.4.2 Bolt Resistance Checks
9.4.3 Pull-Out Checks
9.4.4 Slip Checks
9.4.5 Prying Forces
9.5 Cleats and Members Non-FEM Checks
9.5.1 Action Reaction Principle
9.5.2 Bolt Bearing
9.5.3 Punching Shear
9.5.4 Block Tearing
9.5.5 Simplified Resistance Checks
9.6 Single Constituent Finite Element Models
9.6.1 Remarks on the Finite Element Models of Single Constituents (SCOFEM)
9.6.2 Stiffeners
9.6.3 Meshing
9.6.4 Constraints
9.6.5 Loading
9.6.6 Members: Deciding Member-Stump-Length
9.6.7 Compatibility Issues
9.7 Multiple Constituents Finite Element Models (MCOFEM)
9.7.1 Goal and Use
9.7.2 Mesh Compatibility Between Constituents and Connector Elements
9.7.3 Saturated Internal Bolt Layouts and Contact Non-Linearity
9.7.4 Constraints
9.7.5 Stabilizing Springs and Buckling of Members
9.7.6 Need for Rechecks
9.8 A Path for Hybrid Approach
References
Chapter 10 Analysis: Pure FEM Approach
10.1 Losing the Subconnector Organization
10.2 Finite Elements for Welds.
10.2.1 Introduction
10.2.2 Penetration Welds
10.2.3 Fillet Welds
10.3 Finite Elements for Bolts
10.3.1 Introduction
10.3.2 Bolts in Bearing: No Explicit Bolt-Hole Modeling
10.3.3 Bolts in Bearing: Explicit Bolt-Hole Modeling
10.3.4 Preloaded Bolts: No Explicit Bolt-Hole Modeling
10.3.5 Preloaded Bolts: Explicit Bolt-Hole Modeling
10.3.6 Effect of the Bending Moments in Bolt Shafts
10.3.7 Example: A Bolted Splice Joint Using PFEM
10.4 Loads
10.4.1 PFEM
10.4.2 MCOFEM
10.5 Constraints
10.5.1 PFEM
10.5.2 MCOFEM
10.6 Checking of Welds and Bolts
10.7 Checking of Components
10.8 Stiffness Evaluation
10.9 Analysis Strategies
Reference
Chapter 11 Conclusions and Future Developments
11.1 Conclusions
11.2 Final Acknowledgments
11.2.1 Reasons of This Project
11.3 Future Developments
References
Appendix 1 Conventions and Recalls
A1.1 Recalls of Matrix Algebra, Notation
A1.2 Cross-Sections
A1.3 Orientation Matrix
A1.4 Change of Reference System
A1.5 Pseudocode Symbol Meaning
Appendix 2 Tangent Stiffness Matrix of Fillet-Welds
A2.1 Tangent Stiffness Matrix of a Weld Segment
A2.2 Modifications for Weld Segments Using Contact
A2.3 Tangent Stiffness Matrix of a Weld Layout for the Instantaneous Center of Rotation Method
Appendix 3 Tangent Stiffness Matrix of Bolts in Shear
A3.1 Tangent Stiffness Matrix of a Bolt
A3.2 Tangent Stiffness Matrix of a Bolt Layout for the Instantaneous Center of Rotation Method
Index
Symbols and Abbreviations
Greek Letters
Subscripts.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local notes:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2021. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Other format:
Print version: Rugarli, Paolo Steel Connection Analysis
ISBN:
9781119303480
9781119303466
OCLC:
1019840639