Franklin

Fatal Women of Romanticism.

Other records:
Author/Creator:
Craciun, Adriana.
Publication:
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2002.
Series:
Cambridge Studies in Romanticism
Cambridge Studies in Romanticism ; v.54
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (348 pages)
Subjects:
English literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
Craciun demonstrates how portrayals of fatal women played an important role in the development of Romantic women's poetic identities.
Contents:
Cover
Half-title
Series-title
Title
Copyright
Dedication
Contents
List of illustrations
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Introduction
THE FEMME FATALE AND FEMINIST THEORY
CHAPTER 1 The subject of violence: Mary Lamb, femme fatale
MARY LAMB AND THE VIOLENCE OF THE LETTER
POETRY FOR CHILDREN
MARY LAMB, FEMME FATALE
CONCLUSION: BEAUTY IN UNLOVELINESS
CHAPTER 2 Violence against difference: Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Robinson, and women's strength
THE FRENCH REVOLUTION AND WOMEN
MARY ROBINSON: "WHY MAY NOT WOMEN RESENT AND PUNISH?"
MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT AND THE BODY
THE BEGINNING AND THE END OF DIFFERENCE
WOLLSTONECRAFT AND SADE
CHAPTER 3 "The aristocracy of genius": Mary Robinson and Marie Antoinette
RECUPERATING MARIE ANTOINETTE
MARIE ANTOINETTE, FEMME FATALE
WOMEN WRITERS AND MARIE ANTOINETTE
THE ARISTOCRACY OF GENIUS
HER SATANING MAJESTY: "AN AWFUL LESSON FOR EACH FUTURE AGE"
FEMINIST THEORY AND THE ORDER OF SEDUCTION
CHAPTER 4 Unnatural, unsexed, undead: Charlotte Dacre's Gothic bodies
INTRODUCTION: DACRE'S LITERARY TRADITION AND RECEPTION
CHARLOTTE DACRE'S POETRY
Undead bodies
Sexed and unsexed bodies
Demonic bodies
"I hasten to be disembodied": Dacre and Wuthering Heights
THE PASSIONS AND ZOFLOYA
The Passions
Struggle and subjectivity
Zofloya
or, The Moor. A Romance of the Fifteenth Century
CONCLUSION
CHAPTER 5 "In seraph strains, unpitying, to destroy": Anne Bannerman's femmes fatales
THE PALPABLE OBSCURE
"THE DARK LADIE"
"THE PROPHETESS OF THE ORACLE OF SEÄM"
SPIRITS OF THE STORM
"THE QUEEN OF BEAUTY"
CONCLUSION: "BLEST BE THE GLOOM"
CHAPTER 6 "Life has one vast stern likeness in its gloom": Letitia Landon's philosophy of decomposition
INTRODUCTION: LANDON'S CORPOREAL POETICS.
ENCHANTRESS AND MERMAID IN LITERARY CONTEXT
"The Byron of our poetesses"
"The Enchantress"
"The Fairy of the Fountains"
LANDON'S MERMAIDS IN HISTORICAL AND SCIENTIFIC CONTEXT
"A home already half a grave": poetry and putrescence
The dead versus the living: the politics of miasma
Landon's materialism and Wordsworth's idealism: a critique of "half-knowledge"
CONCLUSION
Notes
INRODUCTION
1 THE SUBJECT OF VIOLENCE: MARY LAMB, FEMME FATALE
2 VIOLENCE AGAINST DIFFERENCE: MARY WOLLSTONECRAFT, MARY ROBINSON, AND WOMEN'S STRENGTH
3 "THE ARISTOCRACY OF GENIUS": MARY ROBINSON AND MARIE ANTOINETTE
4 UNNATURAL, UNSEXED, UNDEAD: CHARLOTTE DACRE'S GOTHIC BODIES
5 "IN SERAPH STRAINS, UNPITYING, TO DESTROY": ANNE BANNERMAN'S FEMMES FATALES
6 "LIFE HAS ONE VAST STERN LIKENESS IN ITS GLOOM": LETITIA LANDON'S PHILOSOPHY OF DECOMPOSITION
Bibliography
MANUSCRIPTS
BOOKS AND ARTICLES
Index.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local notes:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2021. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Other format:
Print version: Craciun, Adriana Fatal Women of Romanticism
ISBN:
9781139148382
9780521816687
OCLC:
57204689
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