Franklin

Natural Enemies : An Introduction to Biological Control.

Author/Creator:
Hajek, Ann E.
Publication:
Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (396 pages)
Subjects:
Pests -- Biological control.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
Introductory text covering biological control of arthropods, vertebrates, weeds and plant pathogens by natural enemies.
Contents:
Cover
Half-title
Title
Copyright
Dedication
Contents
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Chapter 1 Why use natural enemies?
1.1 Historical perspective on chemical pest control
1.2 Why consider biological alternatives?
1.2.1 The pesticide treadmill
1.2.2 Fewer pesticides are available
1.2.3 Synthetic chemical pesticides aren't always the answer
1.2.4 Human health and environmental concerns
1.3 A pest or not?
1.3.1 Invasive species
FURTHER READING
Chapter 2 Introduction to biological control
2.1 Defining biological control
2.1.1 Is use of plants expressing Bt toxins biological control?
2.2 Natural control
2.3 Diversity in biological control
2.3.1 Is biological control always appropriate?
Economic injury level of a crop
Host density
Eradication
2.4 History of biological control
2.4.1 Controlling arthropod pests
2.4.2 Controlling weeds
2.4.3 Controlling plant pathogens and plant parasitic nematodes
2.5 Studying biological control
2.5.1 Sampling
2.5.2 Cages
2.5.3 Removal techniques
2.5.4 Prey enrichment
2.5.5 Direct observation
2.5.6 Evidence of natural enemy activity or presence
FURTHER READING
SELECTED GENERAL REFERENCES ON BIOLOGICAL CONTROL
Part I Strategies for using natural enemies
Chapter 3 Classical biological control
3.1 Uses of classical biological control
3.1.1 New associations
3.2 Success in classical biological control
3.2.1 Success in establishing the natural enemy
3.2.2 Habitats and hosts associated with success
3.2.3 Successful natural enemies
3.2.4 Number of releases
3.2.5 Length of evaluation affects perception of success
3.2.6 Are expectations realistic?
3.3 Economics of classical biological control
3.4 Methods for practicing classical biological control.
3.4.1 Determine the area of origin and identity of the pest
3.4.2 Foreign exploration
3.4.3 Quarantine
3.4.4 Planning releases
3.4.5 Releasing natural enemies
3.4.6 Evaluation of releases
FURTHER READING
Chapter 4 Augmentation: inundative and inoculative biological control
4.1 Inundative biological control
4.2 Inoculative biological control
4.3 Inundative versus inoculative strategies
4.4 Production of natural enemies by industry
4.4.1 The need for a market
4.4.2 The double-edged sword: host specificity
4.5 Products for use
4.5.1 Macroorganisms
Natural enemy strain/species
Mass-production
Storage and transport
Release
4.5.2 Microorganisms
Microbial strain/species
Mass production
Storage and transport
Release
4.6 Regulation
4.7 Natural enemies commercially available for augmentative releases
FURTHER READING
Chapter 5 Conservation and enhancement of natural enemies
5.1 Conserving natural enemies: reducing effects of pesticides on natural enemies
5.2 Enhancing natural enemy populations
5.2.1 Theory underlying vegetational diversity and biological control
5.2.2 Enhancing habitat for natural enemies: within a crop
Providing refuges within a crop
Cover crops
Crop residue management
Crop management
Plant characteristics
Soil
Physical environment
5.2.3 Enhancing habitat for natural enemies: using the area around the field
5.2.4 Providing food for natural enemies
5.2.5 Providing shelter for natural enemies
FURTHER READING
Part II Biological control of invertebrate and vertebrate pests
Invertebrates
Vertebrates
Chapter 6 Ecological basis for use of predators, parasitoids, and pathogens
6.1 Types of invertebrate pests
6.2 Types of natural enemies
6.2.1 Natural enemy attributes.
6.3 Interactions between natural enemies and hosts
6.4 Population regulation
6.4.1 Density dependence
6.4.2 System stability
6.4.3 Host metapopulations
6.4.4 Refuges for hosts
6.5 Is stability necessary for coexistence of natural enemies and hosts?
6.5.1 Allee effects
6.5.2 Responding to population increase
6.6 Microbial natural enemies attacking invertebrates
6.7 Food webs
FURTHER READING
Chapter 7 Predators
7.1 Vertebrate predators
7.2 Invertebrate predators
7.2.1 Predators specifically used for biological control Lady beetles (Order Coleoptera: Family Coccinellidae)
True bugs (Order Hemiptera)
Lacewings (Order Neuroptera)
Predatory mites (Class Arachnida: Order Acarina)
Predatory flies (Order Diptera)
7.2.2 Invertebrate predators providing naturally occurring biological control
Praying mantids (Order Mantodea)
Ground beetles (Order Coleoptera: Family Carabidae)
Ants (Order Hymenoptera: Family Formicidae)
Spiders (Class Arachnida: Order Araneae)
7.3 Specialist versus generalist predators
7.3.1 Effects of predators on other natural enemies
7.4 Use of invertebrate predators for pest control
FURTHER READING
Chapter 8 Insect parasitoids: attack by aliens
8.1 Taxonomic diversity in parasitoids
8.1.1 Parasitic wasps (Order Hymenoptera)
8.1.2 Parasitic flies (Diptera)
8.1.3 Parasitic beetles (Coleoptera)
8.2 Diversity in parasitoid life histories
8.2.1 Life history strategies in parasitoid communities
8.3 Locating and parasitizing a host
8.3.1 Locating the host habitat over long distances
8.3.2 Finding hosts
8.3.3 Accepting a host
8.4 The battle between parasitoid and host
8.4.1 Host defense
8.4.2 Parasitoid attack
8.5 Use of parasitoids in biological control
8.5.1 Classical biological control
8.5.2 Augmentative releases.
FURTHER READING
Chapter 9 Parasitic nematodes
9.1 Steinernematidae and Heterorhabditidae
9.2 Mermithidae
9.3 Use for control
FURTHER READING
Chapter 10 Bacterial pathogens of invertebrates
10.1 Use for pest control
10.1.1 Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt)
Genetic engineering using Bt
Development of resistance
10.1.2 Fighting scarab grubs and mosquito wrigglers
FURTHER READING
Chapter 11 Viral pathogens
11.1 General biology of viruses
11.2 Invertebrate viral pathogens
11.2.1 Use for pest control
Classical biological control
Inundative releases
Genetically improved viruses
11.3 Vertebrate viral pathogens
11.3.1 Myxomatosis
11.3.2 Rabbit calicivirus disease (RCD)
FURTHER READING
Chapter 12 Fungi and microsporidia
12.1 Fungal pathogens of invertebrates
12.1.1 Diversity of fungal pathogens
12.1.2 Use for pest control
Classical biological control
Inundative releases
12.2 Microsporidia
FURTHER READING
Part III Biological control of weeds
Chapter 13 Biology and ecology of agents used for biological control of weeds
13.1 Types of agents
13.2 Weed characteristics
13.3 Types of injury to plants
13.3.1 Reducing flowers and seeds
13.3.2 Direct mortality of plants
13.3.3 Indirect plant mortality
13.3.4 Interactions leading to increased plant stress
Multiple agents
Abiotic stress
Competing plants
13.4 Regulation of weed density by herbivores
13.4.1 How do herbivores regulate plant populations?
13.4.2 Weed population ecology
13.4.3 Weed populations through time
13.5 Measuring impact of biological control
FURTHER READING
Chapter 14 Phytophagous invertebrates and vertebrates
14.1 Invertebrates
14.1.1 Leaf beetles (Order Coleoptera: Family Chrysomelidae)
14.1.2 Weevils (Order Coleoptera: Family Curculionidae).
14.1.3 Pyralid caterpillars (Order Lepidoptera: Family Pyralidae)
14.1.4 Scale insects (Order Hemiptera: Suborder Homoptera: Family Dactylopiidae)
14.1.5 Less frequently used groups
14.2 Successful attributes of invertebrate herbivores
14.2.1 Host specificity and safety testing
14.3 Strategies for use of phytophagous invertebrates
14.3.1 Classical biological control
Weed species
Invertebrate natural enemies
International cooperation
14.3.2 Commercial availability and release
14.3.3 Conservation
14.4 Vertebrates
FURTHER READING
Chapter 15 Plant pathogens for controlling weeds
15.1 Inundative biological control
15.2 Inoculative biological control
15.3 Classical biological control
FURTHER READING
Part IV Biological control of plant pathogens and plant parasitic nematodes
Chapter 16 Biology and ecology of antagonists
16.1 Types of plant pathogens and their antagonists
16.2 Comparing macroecology with microecology
16.3 Ecology of plant pathogens and their antagonists
16.3.1 r and K strategies
16.3.2 Studying antagonists and plant pathogens
16.4 Interactions among microorganisms
16.4.1 Resource competition
16.4.2 Parasitism
16.4.3 Antibiosis
16.5 Indirect effects
16.5.1 Microbial infections inducing resistance
16.5.2 Mycorrhizae
FURTHER READING
Chapter 17 Microbial antagonists combating plant pathogens and plant parasitic nematodes
17.1 Finding antagonists
17.2 Types of antagonists
17.2.1 Fungal antagonists
17.2.2 Chromist antagonists
17.2.3 Bacterial antagonists
17.3 Strategies for using antagonists to control plant pathogens
17.3.1 Augmentation: inundative versus inoculative releases
Seeds and roots
Stems and crowns
Post-harvest fruit
Foliage
17.4 Conservation/environmental manipulation.
17.4.1 Disease suppressive soils.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local notes:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2021. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Other format:
Print version: Hajek, Ann E. Natural Enemies
ISBN:
9780511187148
9780521652957
OCLC:
133160667
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