Franklin

Textual Patterns : Key words and corpus analysis in language education.

Author/Creator:
Scott, Mike.
Publication:
Philadelphia : John Benjamins Publishing Company, 2006.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (214 pages)
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Subjects:
Language and languages -- Computer-assisted instruction.
Discourse analysis -- Data processing -- Study and teaching.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
Textual Patterns introduces corpus resources, tools and analytic frameworks of central relevance to language teachers and teacher educators. Specifically it shows how key word analysis, combined with the systematic study of vocabulary and genre, can form the basis for a corpus informed approach to language teaching. The first part of the book gives the reader a strong grounding in the way in which language teachers can use corpus analysis tools (wordlists, concordances, key words) to describe language patterns in general and text patterns in particular. The second section presents a series of case studies which show how a key word / corpus informed approach to language education can work in practice. The case studies include: General language education (i.e. students in national education systems and those following international examination programmes), foreign languages for academic purposes, literature in language education, business and professional communication, and cultural studies in language education.
Contents:
Textual Patterns
Editorial page
Title page
LCC data
Table of contents
Preface
Part I
Texts in language study and language education
Introduction
Why have corpus-based methods caused an upheaval?
A text focus, a language focus, a culture focus or a brain focus?
The notion of context
Word-lists
Introduction
Transformation
Selection
Kinds of word-list
Alphabetically ordered
Frequency ordered
Other possible orderings
One-word vs. n-word clusters
Adding contextual information to wordlists
Characteristics of word-lists
The nature of high-frequency items
Medium-frequency items
Hapax legomena
The distribution curve and the notion of a "power law''
The notion of "consistency''
What then do word-lists offer?
Notes
Concordances
Introduction
What is meant by co-occurrence?
How much overlap is there between textual co-occurrence and the mental lexicon?
Handling a concordance
Patterns
Clusters
Is ago text-initial? - The dispersion plot
Notes
Key words of individual texts
Introduction
Keyness
An example
Exclamations in Romeo
Different reference corpora
Where do the KWs come in the text?
Local versus global KWs
Links between KWs
Wide- and narrow-span linkages
KWs and part of speech
Key words and genres
Introduction
Keyword linkage between texts
Formal patterns of Keyword linkage
Examples of Keyword linkage between texts
Associates
Conclusion
Notes
Part II
General English language teaching
Summary
Introduction
Resources
Approach
Procedure
Step 1 - Select texts
Step 2 - Make wordlists
Step 3 - Make Keyword lists
Step 4 - Save lists as text files
Step 5 - Create an Excel workbook containing all the data
Findings
Written academic vs. conversation
Of.
That
Looking at a middle ground: Keywords in Fiction and Spoken Academic
Spoken Academic and Fiction Keywords referenced against BNC Sampler Written
Spoken Academic and Fiction Keywords referenced against BNC Spoken
Conclusions
Notes
Business and professional communication
Summary
Introduction
Resources
Approach
Preliminary analysis
Example A
Example B
Example C
Example D
Preliminary analysis: Discussion
KW analysis - hope
Discourse moves
Contractions
Ellipsis
Vague language
Lexical density
KW analysis: Discussion
Notes
Appendix
English for academic purposes
Summary
Introduction
Resources
Approach
Analysis 1: Clusters in academic writing in English
Single word lists
Two-word clusters
Three-word clusters
Four-word clusters
Cluster lists - conclusion
Analysis 2: Clusters in apprentice texts
The Poznan literature MA dissertation corpus
Comparing expert with apprentice academic writing
Comparing apprentice academic writing with general academic texts and expert texts in literary studies
BNC_LIT vs. POZ_LIT - mapping similarity and difference: Three-word clusters
BNC_LIT vs. POZ_LIT - mapping similarity and difference: Four-word clusters
Analysis 1
Analysis 2
Analysis 3
Analysis 4
Analysis 5
Identifying contrast between apprentice and expert performances - An interim conclusion
Notes
Appendix - BNC texts
Poznan literature dissertation titles
What counts in current journalism
Summary
Introduction
Resources
Approach
Analysis 1: Who, what, where?
Who?
Second step - Check the immediate collocates
What and where?
Analysis 1: Conclusion
Analysis 2: It's a man's world - gender balance in the Guardian Weekly's news reporting
Titles
Pronouns
Discussion 1: Family words.
Discussion 2: Nouns
Discussion 3: Verbs
Analysis 2: Conclusion
Analysis 3: A changing world - UK news 1996-2001
UK News top five - GW_UK_NEWS vs. BNC
UK News top twenty
Conclusion
Notes
Counting things in texts you can't count on
Summary
Introduction
Resources
The text
Tools
Analysis 1
Pivot 1
Pivot 2
Pivot 3
Analysis 2
Wordlists and keyword lists
Concordances and keywords
But can you count on it?
Conclusion
References
Name index
Subject index
The series Studies in Corpus Linguistics.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local notes:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2021. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Contributor:
Tribble, Christopher.
Other format:
Print version: Scott, Mike Textual Patterns
ISBN:
9789027293633
9789027222930
OCLC:
237788421