Franklin

Ecological Speciation.

Author/Creator:
Nosil, Patrik.
Publication:
Oxford : Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 2012.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (299 pages)
Series:
Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution Ser.
Oxford Series in Ecology and Evolution Ser.
Status/Location:
Loading...

Options
Location Notes Your Loan Policy

Details

Other records:
Subjects:
Isolating mechanisms.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
The formation of new species ('speciation') creates new biological diversity. This book addresses the role of ecological differences between populations in driving speciation. It reviews this process of 'ecological speciation' from ecological, geographic, and genetic perspectives.
Contents:
Cover
Contents
Introduction
Abbreviations
Part I: Ecological speciation and its alternatives
1 What is ecological speciation?
1.1. The often-continuous nature of the speciation process
1.2. Ecological speciation via divergent natural selection
1.3. A brief history of the ecological speciation hypothesis
1.4. Alternatives to ecological speciation
1.5. Other roles for ecology in speciation: population persistence and niche conservatism
1.6. Summary
2 Predictions and tests of ecological speciation
2.1. Comparative approaches (ERG)
2.2. Trait-based approaches ("magic traits")
2.3. Fitness-based approaches (selection = RI)
2.4. Gene-flow-based approaches (isolation-by-adaptation)
2.5. Phylogenetic shifts method
2.6. Inferring causality when testing for ecological speciation
2.7. Tests and predictions of ecological speciation: conclusions and future directions
Part II: Components of ecological speciation
3 A source of divergent selection
3.1. Differences between environments
3.2. Interactions among populations
3.3. The functional morphology and biomechanics of divergent selection
3.4. Environmentally dependent sexual selection
3.5. Interactions between the different sources of divergent selection
3.6. Sources of divergent selection: conclusions
4 A form of reproductive isolation
4.1. The different forms of reproductive isolation
4.2. How common are different forms of reproductive isolation during ecological speciation?
4.3. For a given point in the speciation process, do multiple reproductive barriers act, and what are their relative contributions to total reproductive isolation?
4.4. Across the ecological speciation process, at what point do different barriers evolve?
4.5. Forms of reproductive isolation: conclusions and future directions.
5 A genetic mechanism to link selection to reproductive isolation
5.1. Genetics of ecological speciation: the theory of divergence hitchhiking
5.2. Linking selection to reproductive isolation via pleiotropy
5.3. Linking selection to reproductive isolation via linkage disequilibrium
5.4. Genetic constraints on ecological speciation
5.5. The individual genetic basis of traits under selection and traits conferring reproductive isolation
5.6. Ecological speciation genes
5.7. Genetic mechanisms: conclusions and future directions
Part III: Unresolved issues
6 The geography of ecological speciation
6.1. Geographic views and definitions of speciation
6.2. Non-allopatric speciation: geographic contact constrains divergence
6.3. Non-allopatric speciation: geographic contact promotes divergence
6.4. The balance between constraining and diversifying effects of gene flow
6.5. Multiple geographic modes of divergence
6.6. Two problems with detecting divergence in the face of gene flow
6.7. Detecting divergence in the face of gene flow: comparative geographic approaches
6.8. Detecting divergence in the face of gene flow: coalescent approaches
6.9. Detecting divergence with gene flow: genomic approaches
6.10. The spatial context of selection: discrete patches versus continuous gradients
6.11. The spatial scale of speciation
6.12. Geography of ecological speciation: conclusions
7 The genomics of ecological speciation
7.1. Heterogeneous genomic divergence
7.2. The metaphor of genomic islands of divergence
7.3. Selective sweeps and adaptation from standing variation versus new mutations
7.4. Gene expression and ecological speciation
7.5. The genomics of ecological speciation: conclusions and future directions
8 The speciation continuum:what factors affect how far speciation proceeds?.
8.1. The speciation continuum
8.2. The stability of partial reproductive isolation
8.3. Non-selective explanations for how far speciation proceeds
8.4. Ecological explanations for how far speciation proceeds
8.5. Multifarious versus stronger selection: theory
8.6. Multifarious versus stronger selection: phenotypic tests
8.7. Multifarious versus stronger selection: genomic tests
8.8. Other factors affecting the speciation continuum
8.9. The speciation continuum: conclusions and future directions
9 Conclusions and future directions
9.1. What we know about ecological speciation
9.2. Future work: 25 unresolved issues in ecological speciation
9.3. Competing hypotheses deserving further work
9.4. Issues warranting further work that were not covered in detail
9.5. Final conclusion
References
Index
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
W
Y.
Notes:
Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.
Local notes:
Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2021. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ProQuest Ebook Central affiliated libraries.
Other format:
Print version: Nosil, Patrik Ecological Speciation
ISBN:
9780191628016
9780199587117
OCLC:
784886698