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Multidirectional Memory : Remembering the Holocaust in the Age of Decolonization / Michael Rothberg.

Author/Creator:
Rothberg, Michael, author., Author,
Publication:
Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press, [2020]
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (408 pages)
Series:
Cultural Memory in the Present
Contained In:
De Gruyter University Press Library.
Status/Location:
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Details

Subjects:
Collective memory in literature.
Collective memory.
Decolonization in literature.
Decolonization -- Historiography.
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945) -- Historiography.
Holocaust, Jewish (1939-1945), in literature.
Language:
In English.
System Details:
Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.
text file PDF
Summary:
Multidirectional Memory brings together Holocaust studies and postcolonial studies for the first time. Employing a comparative and interdisciplinary approach, the book makes a twofold argument about Holocaust memory in a global age by situating it in the unexpected context of decolonization. On the one hand, it demonstrates how the Holocaust has enabled the articulation of other histories of victimization at the same time that it has been declared "unique" among human-perpetrated horrors. On the other, it uncovers the more surprising and seldom acknowledged fact that public memory of the Holocaust emerged in part thanks to postwar events that seem at first to have little to do with it. In particular, Multidirectional Memory highlights how ongoing processes of decolonization and movements for civil rights in the Caribbean, Africa, Europe, the United States, and elsewhere unexpectedly galvanized memory of the Holocaust. Rothberg engages with both well-known and non-canonical intellectuals, writers, and filmmakers, including Hannah Arendt, Aimé Césaire, Charlotte Delbo, W.E.B. Du Bois, Marguerite Duras, Michael Haneke, Jean Rouch, and William Gardner Smith.
Contents:
Frontmatter
Contents
Illustrations
Acknowledgments
1. Introduction: Theorizing Multidirectional Memory in a Transnational Age
2. At the Limits of Eurocentrism: Hannah Arendt's The Origins of Totalitarianism
3. "Un Choc en Retour": Aimé Césaire's Discourses on Colonialism and Genocide
4. W. E. B. Du Bois in Warsaw: Holocaust Memory and the Color Line
5. Anachronistic Aesthetics: André Schwarz-Bart and Caryl Phillips on the Ruins of Memory
6. The Work of Testimony in the Age of Decolonization: Chronicle of a Summer and the Emergence of the Holocaust Survivor
7. The Counterpublic Witness: Charlotte Delbo's Les belles lettres
8. A Tale of Three Ghettos: Race, Gender, and "Universality" After October 17, 1961
9. Hidden Children: The Ethics of Multigenerational Memory After 1961
Epilogue: Multidirectional Memory in an Age of Occupations
Notes
Index
Notes:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed 15. Sep 2020)
Contributor:
De Gruyter.
ISBN:
9780804783330
OCLC:
1198929519
Publisher Number:
10.1515/9780804783330 doi
Access Restriction:
Restricted for use by site license.