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Food Choice, Acceptance and Consumption [electronic resource] / by H.J.H. MacFie, Herbert L. Meiselman.

Author/Creator:
MacFie, H.J.H. author., Author,
Publication:
New York, NY : Springer US : Imprint: Springer, 1996.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (XIV, 258 p.)
Edition:
1st ed. 1996.
Status/Location:
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Subjects:
Sociology.
Food—Biotechnology.
Business.
Management science.
Local subjects:
Sociology, general. (search)
Food Science. (search)
Business and Management, general. (search)
Language:
English
Summary:
It is critical for the food industry to maintain a current understanding of the factors affecting food choice, acceptance and consumption since these influence all aspects of its activities. This subject has matured in recent years and, for the first time, this book brings together a coherent body of knowledge which draws on the experiences in industrial and academic settings of an international team of authors. Written for food technologists and marketeers, the book is also an essential reference for all those concerned with the economic, social, and psychological aspects of the subject.
Contents:
1 The role of the human senses in food acceptance
1.1 Introduction
1.2 The role of vision in food acceptance
1.3 The role of somesthesis and kinesthesis in food acceptance
1.4 The role of audition in food acceptance
1.5 The role of gustation in food acceptance
1.6 The role of olfaction in food acceptance
1.7 Food acceptance measurement: The relative importance of the senses
1.8 Future perspectives
References
2 The socio-cultural context of eating and food choice
2.1 Indirect socio-cultural effects
2.2 Indirect personal effects
2.3 Direct on-line influences
2.4 Sociocultural aspects of the acquisition of norms, beliefs, knowledge and attitudes
2.5 Conclusion
Acknowledgements
References
3 What animal research tells us about human eating
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Methods for studying eating—both strategic and practical
3.3 Phenomena of eating in humans uncovered by studies in animals
3.4 Theoretical framework and experimental evidence
3.5 What animal research tells us about eating disorders in humans
3.6 Conclusions and limitations
Acknowledgements
References
4 The development of children’s eating habits
4.1 The frequency and timing of meals
4.2 Learning, experience and meal size
4.3 Children’s food preferences and food selection
4.4 Summary and implications for child feeding
References
5 What does abnormal eating tell us about normal eating?
5.1 Introduction
5.2 Abnormal eating—quantity
5.3 Abnormal eating—speed
5.4 Abnormal eating—frequency
5.5 Type of food
5.6 Internal and extenal cues
5.7 Social influence
5.8 Precipitants
5.9 Conclusions
References
6 The contextual basis for food acceptance, food choice and food intake: the food, the situation and the individual
6.1 Introduction
6.2 The food
6.3 The eating situation
6.4 The individual
6.5 Summary
References
7 Marketing and consumer behaviour with respect to foods
7.1 Introduction
7.2 Marketing
7.3 Marketing strategies at the product and brand level
7.4 Marketing tactics: organizing the marketing mix
7.5 Consumer orientation in marketing
7.6 Food choice behaviour in affluent societies
7.7 Implications for food marketing
7.8 Illustration: consumer oriented product development
7.9 Conclusions
References
8 Economic influences on food choice—non-convenience versus convenience food consumption
8.1 Introduction
8.2 Time-saving and time-buying strategies
8.3 Methodology—data and variables
8.4 Food regimes
8.5 Statistical model
8.6 Estimation results
8.7 Conclusion
Acknowledgement
References
9 Food choice, mood and mental performance: some examples and some mechanisms
9.1 Introduction
9.2 Effects of foods and food constituents on mood and mental performance
9.3 Relationship between the mood and performance effects of foods and food choice
9.4 Conclusions
Acknowledgement
References
10 Attitudes and beliefs in food habits
10.1 Models of food choice
10.2 Theory of planned behaviour
10.3 Extensions of the theory of planned behaviour
10.4 Self-identity and organic food consumption
10.5 Moral obligation
10.6 Conclusions
Acknowledgements
References
11 Dietary change: changing patterns of eating
11.1 Introduction
11.2 Sources of evidence for dietary change
11.3 Dietary patterns
11.4 Factors involved in dietary change
11.5 Impact of recommendations on diet and health
11.6 Understanding dietary change: future directions
References.
Notes:
Bibliographic Level Mode of Issuance: Monograph
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contributor:
Meiselman, Herbert L. author., Author,
ISBN:
1-4613-1221-3
Publisher Number:
10.1007/978-1-4613-1221-5 doi