Franklin

Conflict, commerce, and an aesthetic of appropriation in the Italian maritime cities, 1000-1150 / by Karen Rose Mathews.

Author/Creator:
Mathews, Karen R., author.
Publication:
Leiden, Netherlands ; Boston, [Massachusetts] : Brill, 2018.
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (236 pages) : illustrations, map, tables, photographs.
Series:
Medieval Mediterranean ; Volume 112.
The Medieval Mediterranean : Peoples, Economies and Cultures, 400-1500, 0928-5520 ; Volume 112
Status/Location:
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Subjects:
Monuments -- Italy -- History -- To 1500.
Appropriation (Architecture) -- Italy -- History -- To 1500.
Building materials -- Recycling -- Italy -- History -- To 1500.
Architecture and society -- Italy -- History -- To 1500.
City-states -- Italy -- Civilization.
Italy -- Civilization -- 476-1268.
Form/Genre:
Electronic books.
Summary:
In Conflict, Commerce, and an Aesthetic of Appropriation in the Italian Maritime Cities, 1000-1150 , Karen Rose Mathews analyzes the relationship between war, trade, and the use of spolia (appropriated objects from past and foreign cultures) as architectural decoration in the public monuments of the Italian maritime republics in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. This comparative study addressing five urban centers argues that the multivalence of spolia and their openness to new interpretations made them the ideal visual form to define a distinct Mediterranean identity for the inhabitants of these cities, celebrating the wealth and prestige that resulted from the paired endeavors of war and commerce while referencing the cultures across the sea that inspired the greatest hostility, fear, or admiration.
Contents:
Front Matter
Contents
Introduction Visualizing Conflict and Commerce in the Maritime Cities of Medieval Italy
Local Traditions and Norman Innovations in the Artistic Culture of Southern Italy
Emulation of and Appropriation from Byzantium in Venetian Visual Culture
The Interplay of Islamic and Ancient Roman Spolia on Pisan Churches
Rivalry with Pisa and Spolia as Plunder of War in Medieval Genoa
Conclusion Shifting Significations of the Spolia Aesthetic.
Notes:
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Description based on print version record.
ISBN:
90-04-36080-8
OCLC:
1019844623
Publisher Number:
10.1163/9789004360808 DOI