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Playwrights and Plagiarists in Early Modern England : Gender, Authorship, Literary Property / Laura J. Rosenthal.

Author/Creator:
Rosenthal, Laura J., author., Author,
Publication:
Ithaca, NY : Cornell University Press, [2019]
Format/Description:
Book
1 online resource (272 pages)
Contained In:
De Gruyter University Press Library.
Status/Location:
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Subjects:
Authorship -- Sex differences -- History -- 17th century.
Authorship -- Sex differences -- History -- 18th century.
English drama -- Women authors -- History and criticism.
English drama -- 18th century -- History and criticism.
English drama -- Restoration, 1660-1700 -- History and criticism.
Intertextuality.
Literature and society -- England.
Plagiarism -- England -- History -- 17th century.
Plagiarism -- England -- History -- 18th century.
Playwriting.
Theater -- England.
Women and literature -- England.
Local subjects:
Literary Studies. (search)
Performing Arts & Drama. (search)
Language:
In English.
System Details:
Mode of access: Internet via World Wide Web.
text file PDF
Summary:
Passage of the first copyright law in 1710 marked a radical change in the perception of authorship. According to Laura J. Rosenthal, the new construction of the author as the owner of literary property bore different consequences for women than for men, for amateurs than for professionals, and for playwrights than for other authors. Rosenthal explores distinctions between legitimate and illegitimate forms of literary appropriation in drama from 1650 to 1730. In considering the alleged plagiarists Margaret Cavendish (the Duchess of Newcastle), Aphra Behn, John Dryden, Colley Cibber, and Susanna Centlivre, Rosenthal maintains that accusations had less to do with the degree of repetition in texts than with the gender of the authors and the cultural location of the plays. Questions of literary property, then, became not just legal matters but part of a discourse aimed at conferring or withholding cultural authority. Struggles over literary property must be seen in the context of competing conceptions of property in general, Rosenthal asserts, and she shows how both Filmerian and Lockean models gender the position of the owner. Drawing on feminist theory and from scholarship in history, philosophy, and political science, Rosenthal debates the relationship between women and property in modern England. Gender and class, she contends, continue to influence judgments as to what stories a playwright can own or use, as to whom critics praise as heirs to Shakespeare and Jonson, and as to whom they damn as plagiarists.
Contents:
Frontmatter
Contents
Acknowledgments
Introduction: Drama and Cultural Location
ONE. Rewriting Distinctions: Property, Plagiarism, Position
TWO. "Authoress of a Whole World": The Duchess of Newcastle and Imaginary Property
THREE. Aphra Behn and the Hostility of Influence
FOUR. "Ladies and Fop Authors Never Are at Odds": Colley Cibber, Female Wits
FIVE. Writing (as) the Lady's Last Stake: Susanna Centlivre
Epilogue
Index
Notes:
Description based on online resource; title from PDF title page (publisher's Web site, viewed 02. Mrz 2022)
Contributor:
De Gruyter.
ISBN:
9781501744808
OCLC:
1129150824
Publisher Number:
10.7591/9781501744808 doi
Access Restriction:
Restricted for use by site license.